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The tally

The Sports Tally provides an annual health check on sports that receive Australia’s Winning Edge funding. This information has been derived from the Annual Sports Performance Review (ASPR) process. Each sport’s high performance progress has been given an overall rating and commentary has been included for high performance, governance and participation. In addition, each sport’s performance has been highlighted through the 2013 benchmark event target and actual results.

The overall high performance rating considers each sport against its annual benchmark event performance, future potential and health of the sport’s high performance system. The sport-specific information and evidence is provided and reviewed in collaboration with national sporting organisations and the national institute network through the:

  • Winning Edge performance case submission and associated assessment panel report
  • high performance planning and reporting template
  • 2013 benchmark event reports
  • 2013 ASPR
  • 2013 performance summary report.

The tally key


underperforming significantly below expectation; solutions to challenges not identified1


progressing evidence of improvement; solutions to challenges being implemented 2


on track working well across key areas; on target 3


performing performing well in all areas; above target 4


excelling exceptional performance; setting a standard for others to aspire 5


Investment - the total ASC investment and the ASC funding as a percentage of total income has been outlined for each sport. The percentage is calculated as total ASC investment 2013-14 divided by the NSO's total actual revenue according to their most recent audited financial report.

Non-medal target - in all cases where no medal has been forecast or where the lower end of a medal range is zero, a non-medal target is agreed. For example, fourth place or a quarter final.

The sports

Archery

High performance 3

Total investment 2013–14: $628,000
(high performance: $600,800, participation: $27,200)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 59.3%
Archery Australia (AA) appointed a new high performance manager and national head coach in 2013, providing a structure from which to improve performances in the coming years. While there was an encouraging individual world championship performance, there remains a need to improve overall team performance and implement appropriate daily training environments for priority athletes.

AA has indicated a willingness to pursue governance changes that would bring greater alignment with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles, but has suggested some changes may not be appropriate given the size and capacity of the organisation.

AA saw significant membership growth in 2013 with many clubs reaching their capacity to cope with the increased interest. While this is a positive result, there is a need for AA to work with its states and clubs to successfully manage a continued increase in the sport’s participant base.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Athletics

High performance 3

High performance (Paralympic) 3

Total investment 2013–14: $8,506,400
(high performance: $6,570,000; high performance - para: $1,630,000; participation: $296,400; other: $10,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 67.1%(uses budgeted revenue 2013/14)

The Athletics Australia (AA) results at the world championships in 2013 were largely in line with expectations but there remains a need to improve depth and build consistency at major events. The Paralympic team performed close to expectations but narrowly missed gold medals in a number of events. Positive changes to the high performance structure and strategic plan are being implemented.

In 2013 AA and Little Athletics Australia (LAA) worked closely with the ASC to progress a merger. A Heads of Agreement (HoA) was developed and endorsed unanimously by the board of AA with very strong support from its members. However, the board of LAA voted against the HoA in December and consequently there is not a single national entity for athletics. While the divided governance model remains a significant barrier to the sport’s long-term success and sustainability, AA has made progress in other governance areas in the past year and is generally in line with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles.

There have been increases in the number of full active participants, coaches and officials in the past year. Progress is still required in a number of key participation initiatives such as junior pathway, club capability, workforce development and data collection.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2 to 4

Actual: gold 0 silver 2 bronze 1 total 3

2013 benchmark event — Paralympic // world championships

Medal target: 20 to 25

Actual: gold 4 silver 6 bronze 13 total 23

Australian Paralympic Committee managed sport

High performance 3

Total investment 2013–14: $5,615,000*

*This includes $4,280,000 for the APC operational expenses and $1,335,000 for the five Paralympic sports managed by the APC. In addition, $8,891,250 is provided to 13 non-APC managed Paralympic sports.

As well as overseeing the preparation of the Australian team for Paralympic Games, the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC) directly manages five high performance programs.

  • The wheelchair rugby team won gold at the London 2012 Paralympic Games and in 2013 won its benchmark event. While the team is on track to perform strongly in Rio, the longer term sustainability of the program could be challenged by the lack of a national competition in Australia. The recent establishment of an Australian A team is a positive step to improving the athlete pathway.
  • At this stage it appears unlikely powerlifting will contribute to Australia’s Paralympic Games medal target in 2016. There are currently few international-standard athletes in the system and the high performance pathway is not sufficient to increase the depth of athletes.
  • The APC has been developing a national boccia program since 2008, initially as a development program but more recently as a high performance program. The sport is unlikely to win a medal in Rio but the APC is targeting a strong performance in 2020.
  • The men’s and women’s goalball teams failed to qualify for the 2014 world championships, raising concerns about the sport’s ability to contribute to the Rio medal target. Improving athlete depth continues to be a key focus of the goalball program.
  • In winter sports, Australia was expected to be competitive, however most of the 2013 benchmark events were cancelled. The program achieved two bronze medals and ranked 19th on the overall medal table. Even though the medal target was achieved, the overall performance was at the low end of the expected range. Access to good quality on-snow facilities in the domestic daily training environment and access to international competition remain key issues.

In terms of governance, the APC commenced a reform process from early 2014. Governance changes required include creating a nominations committee, identifying skills gaps on the board, implementing staggered board rotation, commencing board performance evaluation and improving gender balance.

The following represents the high performance rating by Paralympic managed sports:

Boccia 3

Goalball 2

Rugby (wheelchair) 3

Powerlifting (para) 1

Winter sports (para) 3

Boccia — 2013 benchmark event — Paralympic // Asia and Oceania Championships

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Goalball — 2013 benchmark event — Paralympic // Asia-Pacific Championships

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Rugby (wheelchair) — 2013 benchmark event — Paralympic // IWRF Asia Oceania Africa Regional Championships

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Powerlifting — 2013 benchmark event — Paralympic // IPC Asian Open Championships

Medal target: 0 to 3

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Winter sports — 2013 benchmark event — Paralympic // world cup final — Sochi

Medal target: 3 to 5

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

Badminton

High performance 2

Total investment 2013–14: $717,000
(high performance: $540,000, participation: $177,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 36.6%
Badminton’s performance profile for Rio 2016 changed in 2013 following the retirement of a key athlete. The high performance program’s focus has now shifted to the development of players for medium-term events such as the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games and the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Changes to the high performance and leadership structure should enhance coaching and talent identification within the sport.

Badminton Australia (BA) has put significant work into updating its constitution and will continue to pursue governance changes in 2014 with the assistance of the ASC.

BA achieved 6 per cent growth in participation in terms of its full active membership in 2013. The sport is targeting further growth with a focus on culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target:

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Basketball

High performance 3

High performance (Paralympic) 3

Total investment 2013–14: $6,635,905
(high performance: $4,780,000; high performance — para: $1,075,000; participation: $716,400; other: $64,505)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 48.3%

Basketball Australia (BA) has full-time head coaches for the men’s and women’s Olympic and Paralympic programs for the first time since 2000. Performance in the Oceania qualifying events was in line with the 2013 expectations, with all teams qualifying for their respective 2014 world championships. A key aspect of BA’s high performance strategy has been the establishment of a National Centre of Excellence at the AIS Canberra campus, providing greater access and reach to priority athletes.

BA is progressing towards compliance with the mandatory governance principles, including the adoption of a revised proportionate voting system. There is scope for improvement in the areas of transparency and timely reporting. The de-merger of the National Basketball League (NBL) from BA has been finalised. The future relationship between the two organisations will be critical to support athlete pathways and participation growth.

The Aussie Hoops program is being re-launched in 2014, with targeted pilots indicating the program can be effective at driving increased participation. BA is investigating a more effective national database registration system to enable the capture of more accurate participation data.

2013 benchmark event // Oceania Regional championships

Medal target: 2

Actual: gold 2 silver 0 bronze 0 total 2

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic // Oceania Regional championships

Medal target: 2

Actual: gold 2 silver 0 bronze 0 total 2

Bowls

High performance 4

Total investment 2013–14: $1,348,000
(high performance: $667,200; participation: $546,800; other: $134,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 25.0%

Australia is a ranked number one in world bowls and produced a strong performance in line with expectations at the benchmark event in 2013. The team is considered to be on track to meet its performance targets at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. The focus of the high performance program continues to be on developing individual athlete plans, monitoring and exploring technological advancements to keep their world number one status.

Bowls Australia (BA) has made a number of positive changes to its governance and is proactive in its discussions with stakeholders as it seeks greater alignment with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. A new strategic plan was released in late 2013 with support from all state associations.

BA has implemented and executed a successful participation strategy. Regular participation has increased however, the decline in full active members remains a concern. BA is responding by diversifying its product offering in an attempt to attract new members.

2013 benchmark event // 8 Nations Test Event

Medal target: 2

Actual: gold 2 silver 2 bronze 1 total 5

Boxing

High performance 2

Total investment 2013–14: $904,000
(high performance: $850,000; participation: $54,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 69.5%

The sport continues to have difficulty retaining athletes after the Olympic cycle and had a disappointing performance at the world championships in 2013. Boxing Australia (BA) is in the process of appointing a new head coach. Significant work is required to improve coaching more broadly and to fast-track individual athlete development in their high performance system. The new AIS Combat Centre will assist this development by adding value to the athlete pathway.

BA has implemented several changes in line with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles, including registering as a company limited by guarantee. Further work remains to be done in governance, as outlined in a whole-of-sport review that was facilitated by the ASC.

While BA has not traditionally prioritised participation growth due to a lack of resources, the organisation is currently researching participation product offerings and is working on information and communication technology (ICT) improvements to collect improved data about the sport.

2013 benchmark event // world championships - men

Medal target:

Non-medal target achieved: No

Canoeing

High performance 3

High performance (Paralympic) 3

Total investment 2013–14: $3,909,431
(high performance: $3,576,431; high performance — para: $225,000; participation: $108,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 55.9% (uses Budgeted Revenue 2013/14)

Australian Canoeing (AC) has recently implemented an enhanced coaching structure in the sprint and slalom disciplines. While performances at the world championships were slightly below expectations, there were encouraging signs for medal opportunities in the future, particularly in the men’s 1000-metre events. The sport has benefited from strong and unified national high performance leadership over a number of years. Para canoe is a new sport on the Rio 2016 program and as such international competition is intensifying.

AC needs to continue working towards greater alignment with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles in 2014. The organisation has agreed in principle to become a company limited by guarantee, has passed a motion at the 2013 annual general meeting to ensure board gender diversity, and has recently formed a nominations committee.

The sport is currently developing a strategic and national direction for its participation activities. AC has started to look to the wider paddle community (outrigger canoeing and dragon boating) as a means to drive participation growth.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2 to 4

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 1 total 2

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic // world championships

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Cricket

High performance 4

Total investment 2013–14: $1,526,000
(high performance: $400,000; participation: $1,116,000; other: $10,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 0.9%

While the men’s Test team lost the Ashes in England in the middle of 2013, the Ashes were regained with a comprehensive 5-0 series win in the Australian summer. The women’s team is currently world champion in both the one-day international and T20 formats. Investment by the sport into the athlete pathway, including through the new Centre of Excellence in Brisbane, should provide the required support for its long-term athlete development model and improvements to coaching.

The governance reform off the back of the Crawford/Carter Report is being implemented as the sport transitions to a fully independent board by 2017. While many of the ASC’s mandatory governance principles have been fully implemented, there is ongoing work as Cricket Australia (CA) goes through the transitional process.

CA’s participation data showed growth of 8 per cent in 2013. A number of initiatives have led to a growth in female participation and outdoor participation, while overall exposure to the game through in2Cricket and T20 Blast has increased by 22 per cent. Future challenges include further increasing entry-level participation, addressing the decline in the indoor game and growing the appeal of club cricket.

2013 benchmark event // The Ashes Australian Sports Commission - men, world cup - women

Medal target: 2

Actual: gold 2 silver0 bronze 0 total 2

Cycling

High performance (including BMX) 3

High performance (Paralympic) 4

Total investment 2013–14 (including BMX): $9,157,500
(high performance: $7,445,000; high performance — para: $1,120,000; participation: $592,500)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 62.5%

Cycling’s performance in benchmark events was in line with expectations in most disciplines, except in para cycling where targets were exceeded. The Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games will be a highly competitive event for Cycling Australia (CA) providing an opportunity to benchmark performance against quality competition.

CA has made limited progress towards implementing the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. The recent leadership appointments at CA provide increased confidence in the sport’s future administration. Priorities for the coming 12 months include making rapid progress on governance reform by mid-year, further implementation of recommendations from the Wood Review and establishing a stable financial platform for growing the sport.

CA’s focus in participation has been to consolidate its products and create a single entry point for all disciplines, but further work is necessary for this project to progress effectively.

2013 benchmark event // world championships - track, mountain bike, road, BMX

Medal target: 5 to 7

Actual: gold 2 silver2 bronze 2 total 6

2013 benchmark event Paralympic // world championships - road

Medal target: 6 to 8

Actual: gold 4 silver0 bronze 5 total 9

Diving

High performance 3

Total investment 2013–14: $2,142,200
(high performance: $2,115,000; participation: $27,200)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 85.2% (uses budgeted revenue 2013/14)

Post the London 2012 Olympic Games and due to athlete injury, the sport predicted a rebuilding year and did not win a medal at the 2013 world championships in Barcelona. However, overall performances have been declining at Olympic level since Athens 2004 and the sport is looking to show improvement in 2014 to demonstrate it is on track for medals in Rio 2016. Diving Australia (DA) is considering the application of its high performance resources to ensure that the daily training environment provided to athletes is of the required standard. This consideration will need to be part of the formulation of its high performance plan for Rio, together with providing a greater focus to the synchronised pairs events.

A move to a company limited by guarantee and an updated constitution was endorsed at the Annual General Meeting in October 2013 and DA is in the process of adopting policies and procedures to fully comply with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. The key areas for attention include creating a single strategic direction for the sport and an annual performance evaluation process for the board.

Diving has a small participation base and the sport does not currently have the facilities or capacity to deliver significant participation outcomes.

2013 benchmark event // FINA World Championships

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Equestrian

High performance 3

High performance (Paralympic) 3

Total investment 2013–14: $2,977,000
(high performance: $2,140,000; high performance — para: $500,000; participation: $337,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 47.8%

Equestrian Australia (EA) has developed a horse and athlete management system for all its medal prospects. 2014 is a priority year with the world equestrian games in Normandy, France, and performance will be closely monitored to determine if they are on track for medals in Rio 2016. The para equestrian program continues to show potential and remains on track for medals in Rio 2016.

EA is on track to implement the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. The key areas for attention in the next 12 months are the establishment of a nominations committee and an annual board performance evaluation. These will be addressed as part of a broader governance review that EA is planning to undertake this year.

In participation, the implementation of the new national membership structure is a significant milestone, streamlining over 45 membership categories down to six. This will enable EA to accurately report membership data in future years. The junior participation program, Ready Set Trot, is now up and running and is expected to gain momentum in 2014.

2013 benchmark event // Les Etoiles de Pau

Medal target: -

Non-Mmedal target achieved: Yes

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic// Dressage Festival, Werribee, Victoria

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Football

High performance 2

High performance (Paralympic) 1

Total investment 2013–14: $3,391,000
(high performance: $2,300,000; high performance — para: $175,000; participation: $916,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 3.5%

Recent structural and personnel changes within the high performance setup of football require monitoring to ensure progression of teams towards contributing to Winning Edge goals. The level of support provided to the Matildas will be an important consideration if the team is to perform strongly at upcoming major events. The Socceroos qualified for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil but have drawn a difficult group alongside Spain, the Netherlands and Chile.

The performance profile of para football suggests they are unlikely to qualify for Rio 2016. Discussions are underway between Football Federation Australian (FFA), AIS and APC.

FFA is proactive in ensuring best practice governance standards are met and that the organisation is aligned to the ASC mandatory governance principles. FFA has developed a succession plan which will assist preparing for the loss of three inaugural and experienced directors in 2015, including chairman Frank Lowy.

Football has strong market share in participation. Key growth areas included futsal and school-managed participants, while senior outdoor membership decreased slightly. The MyFootballClub digital platform has been rolled out successfully across the country.

2013 benchmark event // world under-17 cup - men,various friendlies - women

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: No

Golf

High performance 4

Total investment 2013–14: $1,511,600
(high performance: $1,010,000; participation: $501,600)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 12.7%

Men’s golf had an outstanding year with a win and three podiums in the four championship events. As a new Olympic discipline, the sport is familiarising itself with the unique nature of the Olympic multi-sport event environment and how best to engage, monitor and support athletes in the professional environment. Women’s golf continues to show signs of improvement, however their athletes remain some distance from podium potential on their campaign to Rio 2016.

Golf Australia (GA) is actively working to align itself with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. The ASC has been requested to assist GA with a governance review to achieve greater national alignment with its state associations.

GA has undertaken a significant volume of research and strategic development, which has positioned the sport well to deliver new participation products in the coming year. These will target junior, female and casual golfers.

2013 benchmark event // championship events

Medal target: 0 to 2

Actual: gold 1 silver1 bronze 2 total 4

Gymnastics

High performance 2

Total investment 2013–14: $3,198,971
(high performance: $2,372,971; participation: $816,000; other: $10,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 45.5%

In 2013 Gymnastics Australia (GA) focused on developing the degree of difficulty in athletes’ routines as part of its 2016 strategy, rather than targeting outright athlete performance at the 2013 world championships. Nevertheless, GA still set a high qualification standard for the world championship and as such only three athletes qualified. While the team did not achieve its Winning Edge performance targets at the championships, there is sufficient evidence to suggest the sport is making progress towards its Glasgow 2014 and Rio 2016 targets. There remains a need to ensure consistency of quality coaching, facilities and equipment in the sport’s training locations around the country.

GA is on track towards complying with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. Key areas still to be addressed include the establishment of a nominations committee as well as achieving better gender balance and mix of skills on the board. The past 12 months has seen a significant improvement in GA’s planning, delivery and reporting.

GA developed a new strategic and sport development plan in 2013. LaunchPad continues to be the brand for GA’s junior programs and is a key area of focus in the coming year.

2013 benchmark event // world championship

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target achieved: No

Hockey

High performance 3

Total investment 2013–14: $6,572,800
(high performance: $5,901,000; participation: $661,800; other: $10,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 63.0%

The Hockey Australia (HA) men’s and women’s teams performed strongly in 2013 and are well placed for the 2014 world cup in the Netherlands and the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. HA has developed a new high performance plan.

HA has a sound governance structure that aligns well with the mandatory governance principles.

The sport’s performance in participation has been strong and HA appears to be on track to achieve its long-term targets. There has been a focus on both recruitment and retention across all core programs, with transition from junior programs into a club structure seen as key to retaining participants in the long term.

2013 benchmark event // World League Round 3 - men, women

Medal target: 2

Actual: gold 1 silver1 bronze 0 total 2

Judo

High performance 1

Total investment 2013–14: $684,000
(high performance: $667,800; participation: $16,200)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 56.9%

Judo Federation of Australia (JFA) had a very disappointing year in and out of competition in 2013. While the result at the world championships was in line with expectations, a significant number of athletes did not progress past the first round. The new AIS Combat Centre in Canberra will provide significant opportunities to enhance the daily training environment for priority judo athletes. This initiative will enable more camp-based activities, which can more effectively track physical, tactical and technical progression of athletes, as well as more consistent sports science and sports medicine support.

In 2013 JFA had significant governance issues relating to integrity and member protection, conflict of interest, lack of process and poor communication. The lack of a clear direction within the sport has been a concern, with a governance and cultural review planned by the ASC. JFA must implement a number of the ASC’s mandatory governance principles if it is to function effectively in the future. The appointment of a CEO is a key step to improving the leadership and direction of the sport.

JFA’s primary focus is on achieving high performance outcomes, and grass roots development is not regarded as a high priority. JFA did not achieve its set participation targets for 2013 and does not have an employee specifically allocated to the development of the sport.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Motor sport

High performance 2

Total investment 2013–14: $339,800
(high performance: $275,000; participation: $64,800)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 3.7%

The Confederation of Australian Motor Sport (CAMS) has limited direct influence on the athletes that can contribute to Winning Edge targets in international events. Instead, the AIS investment in CAMS is directed to the development pathway. The appointment of a driver development manager is a significant step in improving the driver pathway, tracking potential elite drivers, as well as improving coaching.

CAMS’ governance structure complies with many of the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. Areas for improvement include implementing a nominations committee and an audit and risk committee. Board diversity will be important in the longer term.

Despite staffing changes, most projects in the participation area are progressing. There was a continued focus on club development and increasing junior participation, with JRACE being finalised and rolled out in Victoria. Focuses for 2014 include the development of a participation and development plan and the implementation of a new database to improve data integrity.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 0 to 2

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Motorcycling

High performance 1

Total investment 2013–14: $394,400
(high performance: $330,000; participation: $64,400)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 6.1%

AIS investment in motorcycling is directed towards the rider pathway rather than athletes who can contribute to Winning Edge targets in international events. Motorcycling Australia (MA) conducts a number of development programs for young riders with a view to developing Australia’s future world champions. The sport does not currently have any strong prospects of success in the major international competitions and needs to improve its programs and systems to increase the probability of a consistent pipeline of talent into Moto GP.

MA currently meets some of the ASC’s mandatory governance principles and has indicated willingness to progress reforms in the future.

MA experienced good membership growth in 2013 and continued to strengthen its junior participation and coaching programs. Women’s participation continues to be a focus at all levels.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 0 to 2

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Netball

High performance 4

Total investment 2013–14: $3,044,900
(high performance: $2,065,000; participation: $979,900)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 25.2%

The sport met its 2013 targets with a convincing series win against New Zealand in the Constellation Cup. The team is on track to win a gold medal at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games and the 2015 world cup. In 2014 Netball Australia (NA) will be developing a high performance strategy for 2015 and beyond.

NA is progressing well against the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. NA continues to work effectively with its member state organisations to improve governance at a national and state level.

NA delivered on all aspects of its sport development plan in 2013, including achieving membership growth. A key project for the next year is a membership model review, which will enable product delivery to meet market demands.

2013 benchmark event // Constellation Cup

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Olympic Winter Institute of Australia

High performance 3

Total investment 2013–14: $1,973,645
(high performance: $1,973,645)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 51.7%

The Olympic Winter Institute of Ausralia’s (OWIA) primary purpose is elite high performance for nine disciplines of winter sports. Strong Australian performances were recorded in the 2013 benchmark events. Results from Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games were within range, however leaving Sochi without a gold medal was below expectation. OWIA continues to build depth and produce a greater number of world cup medal-winning performances across a wider range of disciplines. There has been progress with the freestyle water jump and Perisher half-pipe facilities projects in the past year. These facilities will provide quality domestic training venues for elite winter athletes.

Established by the Australian Olympic Committee, OWIA has a unique structure given its purpose is specific only to high performance. OWIA is a company limited by guarantee. It operates under a corporate governance framework consistent with that of AOC. To the extent to which this framework does not align with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles, discussions will be undertaken with the AOC to improve alignment. The Winning Edge investment approach will be applied to the OWIA for the first time in 2014

The OWI does not administer participation programs.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2 to 4

Actual: gold 1 silver 1 bronze 2 total 4

Rowing

High performance 3

High performance (Paralympic) 4

Total investment 2013–14: $7,441,897
(high performance: $6,872,497; high performance — para: $480,000; participation: $89,400)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 81.4%

Performances of Olympic-class boats at the 2013 world championships were in line with expectations but at the lower end of the forecast range. The Paralympic class boats exceeded expectations and finished on top of the medal tally. Rowing Australia’s (RA) high performance program has changed significantly since the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, where the Australian teams had a solid medal-winning performance but failed to win a gold medal. There is sufficient evidence to suggest rowing will perform strongly at future major events including the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Following an independent review of its governance arrangements, RA has implemented significant constitutional reform to achieve alignment with the mandatory governance principles. RA will need to continue to work closely with its member states to implement these recommendations.

In participation, RA’s Adopt a School rowing pilot program exceeded its target numbers in 2013, with significant increases in total participants, students involved in racing and students who joined clubs at the end of the program.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2 to 4

Actual: gold 1 silver 1 bronze 0 total 2

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic // world championships

Medal target: 1 to 2

Actual: gold 2 silver 0 bronze 0 total 2

Rugby League

High performance 4

Total investment 2013–14: $816,660
(high performance: $190,660; participation: $616,000; other: $10,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 0.3%

The sport achieved its Winning Edge target in 2013 with the Kangaroos winning the world cup in the United Kingdom in convincing fashion. The women’s team, the Jillaroos, also won the world cup in 2013. As with other sports with strong professional competitions, the AIS investment in rugby league is targeted towards the athlete pathway rather than to the top professional athletes.

Under the new Australian Rugby League Commission (ARLC) constitution and governance operations, the sport meets the majority of the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. In 2013 the ARLC entered into a strategic alliance with Touch Football Australia in a bid to create efficiencies in the delivery of rugby league and touch football nationally.The partnership has the potential to create better alignment and consolidation of people, resources and competitions across the country — working together on both forms of the game under the NRL banner.

In 2013 the sport achieved a record number of registrations in club rugby league, including a record number of mini footballers (6–12 years old). Female participation in the sport grew by 21.8 per cent and masters rugby league continued its growth with player registrations increasing 14.2 per cent during the year.

2013 benchmark event // world cup

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Rugby Union

High performance (rugby 7s) 2

Total investment 2013–14: $1,712,300
(high performance: $1,040,000; participation: $666,000; other: $6,300)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 1.8%

AIS investment in the sport is targeted at the men’s and women’s 7s program with the sport making its Olympic debut at Rio in 2016. The teams’ performances at the 2013 world cup did not reach Australian Rugby Union (ARU) expectations, with both teams finishing fifth. Some positive strategic changes have commenced in the programs, however significant work remains if the sport is to achieve its medal ambitions for Rio 2016 and the men’s team targets in Glasgow 2014.

In the 15-a-side game, the Wallabies recovered from a disappointing start to the year in which they lost to the Lions and only beat Argentina in the Rugby Championships. A change of coach led to increased optimism and the team won all but their first game on the end-of-year European tour, raising their world ranking to third.

Changes to the ARU constitution in late 2012 brought the sport closer to alignment with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. The ARU is currently redeveloping its national plan and has embarked on a comprehensive consultation process. The new plan will focus on new markets, financial stability and improved high performance results.

The sport recorded solid participation growth during the year and has increased its longer term participation targets. The new ARU strategic plan is likely to have a strong focus on growing participation, particularly through women and 7s.

2013 benchmark event // world championships - 7s men, 7s women

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Sailing

High performance 4

High performance (Paralympic) 3

Total investment 2013–14: $6,657,882
(high performance: $5,396,682; high performance — para: $705,000; participation: $546,400; other: $9,800)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 52.0%

The sport’s high performance leadership has been strong over a number of years, which was reflected in the outstanding 2012 Olympic campaign and sustained performances through 2013. The Paralympic sailing team performed well at the world championships in Ireland. Key issues for Yachting Australia (YA) in the coming years include ensuring the successful return of priority athletes from the America’s Cup campaigns and building further depth in world-class coaching.

YA has adopted several new policies and principles to ensure it is working towards meeting the mandatory governance principles. It has been agreed that YA will complete a review of its current structure, in conjunction with state associations, before moving to a company limited by guarantee during 2014.

YA achieved growth in active members and program participants in 2013. Implementing strategies to grow revenue sources through commercial opportunities and increased sponsorship of national programs is a priority for YA in 2014.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2 to 3

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic // IFDS World Championships

Medal target: -

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

Shooting

High performance 2

High performance (Paralympic) 2

Total investment 2013–14: $2,331,200
(high performance: $1,960,000; high performance — para: $295,000; participation: $76,200)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 85.9%

Shooting Australia (SA) appointed a high performance manager in April 2013. This has allowed the organisation to have a greater focus on achieving high performance outcomes. There are some signs of improvement, however work needs to be done to demonstrate shooting will be a genuine medal contender in Rio 2016 and beyond. Shooting’s performances will continue to be monitored closely in 2014. Athletes will need to demonstrate a genuine commitment to the required high performance culture and program standards to be internationally successful. SA is finalising its athlete categorisation, which will allow greater resource support to committed medal-potential athletes.

SA continues to progress towards alignment with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles and a new CEO was appointed in 2013. SA is working towards finalising memorandum of understanding with all member federations.

SA is primarily a high performance organisation, with participation programs the responsibility of member federations. In the future SA may look at leading national participation strategies.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic // IPC World Cup Bangkok

Medal target: 1 to 2

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Ski and Snowboard

High performance 4

Total investment 2013–14: $784,000
(high performance: $767,600; participation: $16,400)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 29.5%

Ski and Snowboard Australia (SSA) has an agreement with the Olympic Winter Institute of Australia (OWIA) for the OWIA to deliver programs for the majority of SSA’s senior high performance athletes.

SSA is generally compliant with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles but further work is likely in this area in 2014.

SSA has benefited from a participation demonstration project grant from the ASC, allowing the launch of its Snowracer program. Participants in the program increased significantly in 2013 and the program is on track to reach its longer term goal. SSA also has school-delivered programs, which increased modestly in 2013.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2 to 4

Actual: gold 1 silver 1 bronze 2 total 4

Squash

High performance 2

Total investment 2013–14: $1,038,400
(high performance: $920,000; participation: $118,400)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 68.1%

While Australia finished fourth at the 2013 world men’s team championships, it does not currently have an individual athlete ranked inside the top 10 in the world. However, a number of athletes are ranked between 10 and 30. The focus for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games remains on doubles events as this is where Australia is likely to have the best chance of winning medals.

Squash Australia (SA) is progressing towards complying with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. An external consultant was engaged to complete a governance review and SA is now implementing the recommendations.

SA has made a considerable impact with its launch of OzSquash through the Active After-schools Communities program, more than doubling participation compared to last year. SA has developed and piloted in-centre and in-schools participation products. The Squash Matrix system will deliver more accurate national membership information.

2013 benchmark event // world senior men's team championships

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Surf life saving

High performance 3

Total investment 2013–14: $1,267,000
(high performance: $605,000; participation: $411,600; other: $250,400)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 4.9%

Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) has restructured and renewed its high performance team and strategy. As well as aiming to win the biennial world championships, SLSA has a key role in providing a pathway to Olympic sports such as sprint kayak, rowing and open water swimming. The sport achieved its benchmark result in 2013 by winning the International Surf Rescue Challenge in Japan.

SLSA undertook a major external organisational review in late 2012 and the board has signed off on all recommendations. The review’s governance recommendations will bring the organisation in line with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. However, SLSA has retained representative elected directors on its board who are not required to rescind their state-based positions, thus creating the potential for conflicts of interest. This lack of independence is inconsistent with the ASC’s sports governance principles.

The sport’s participation priorities were hindered by the reform work being undertaken at the national level, which led to a significant internal restructure and the turnover of several key staffing positions. The new structure should leave SLSA well placed to make significant gains in the participation area in the coming years.

2013 benchmark event // International Surf Rescue Challenge

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Surfing

High performance 4

Total investment 2013–14: $1,511,600
(high performance: $925,000; participation: $586,600)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 23.1%

Surfing Australia (SA) continues to grow its high performance program and increase its commitment to the athlete pathway. Australia has the current male world champion, while Australian women finished second and third in the 2013 world championship tour. The sport has a sophisticated pathway which is highly likely to continue to produce athletes who will achieve Winning Edge targets.

SA meets the majority of the ASC’s mandatory governance principles and has recently transitioned from an incorporated association to a company limited by guarantee.

SA continues to build the sport’s national junior program, SurfGroms. The Australian Boardriders Battle was launched in 2013 as a strategy to drive engagement with state associations and to provide exclusive benefits to club members. It is anticipated that this type of product offering may also highlight the advantage of club membership to SurfGroms participants.

2013 benchmark event // world tour

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 1 silver1 bronze 2 total 4

Swimming

High performance 3

High performance (Paralympic) 3

Total investment 2013–14: $10,735,750

(high performance: $8,165,000; high performance — para: $1,910,000; participation: $616,000; other: $44,750)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 40.9%

Swimming Australia Limited (SAL) has implemented significant change since the disappointing London 2012 Olympic campaign. There is new leadership across the sport and there has been encouraging progress in implementing the recommendations of the Independent Swimming Review.

The 2013 world championships in Barcelona resulted in improved performance in and out of the pool, while the performance of the Paralympic swimming team at the Montreal world championships was positive and in line with expectations. SAL is well placed to be a major gold medal contributor at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games.

The sport has made good progress towards implementing the mandatory governance principles, with further changes on track to be completed in 2014 to achieve full compliance.

SAL is working with the ASC on a number of participation projects in line with a new organisational strategy to engage with the broader swimming audience and support the sport's long-term viability.

2013 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 12 to 16

Actual: gold 3 silver 9 bronze 0 total 12

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic // IPC World Championships

Medal target: 20 to 30

Actual: gold 11 silver 4 bronze 12 total 27

Table Tennis

High performance (Paralympic) 3

Total investment 2013–14: $592,000
(high performance — para: $290,000; participation: $198,200; other: $103,800)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 50.1%

The Winning Edge investment in table tennis is only targeted at the Paralympic program. The program is underpinned by high performance squads in most states. The shallow depth of internationally competitive athletes is a challenge, but Table Tennis Australia (TTA) has identified and is monitoring the development of some emerging talent. Performances at the 2013 benchmark event were positive and TTA will have four qualification spots for the 2014 world para championships (with the potential for a fifth spot).

TTA meets some of the mandatory governance principles but there are some that need to be addressed, such as the maximum terms of office, independent directors and a nominations committee. There have been ongoing discussions regarding these changes but a timeline has not yet been finalised.

TTA has delivered on many aspects of its participation plan in the past year. The implementation of the national membership database is almost completed and TTA can now report membership and participation data accurately. The participation program has gained momentum, with 12 priority projects established and participation numbers exceeding targets. There has been substantial growth in participation of people with disability, which has resulted from TTA working with rehabilitation hospitals in Sydney.

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic// Oceania Para Regionals, Factor 50 event

Medal target: 17

Actual: gold 9 silver 8 bronze 6 total 23

Tennis

High performance 2

High performance (Paralympic) 3

Total investment 2013–14: $1,642,250
(high performance: $400,000; high performance — para: $261,250; participation: $966,000; other: $15,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 0.9%

The performances of Australian doubles pairings in 2013 were solid, with a mixed doubles pairing winning the Australian Open and a ladies doubles pairing making the final of three of the four grand slams. In singles, the best result for any player was the fourth round of a grand slam; however, there were strong performances from some emerging juniors. Like other professional sports, AIS investment in tennis is primarily targeted at the athlete pathway. Performances in wheelchair tennis were in the expected range but a key challenge for the future is having more athletes qualify for grand slam events.

Tennis Australia (TA) implemented a significant governance reform strategy in 2008 to move to a fully independent board and bring the organisation into close alignment with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles.

TA continues to grow participation in key programs Tennis Hot Shots and Cardio Tennis. In 2013, TA launched a range of new initiatives to support these programs, including Tennis Community Play and Hot Shots tournaments. TA also announced a new program, AO Blitz, which combines innovative online engagement and community events to connect the Australian community with the Australian Open and summer tennis events.

2013 benchmark event // grand slams

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 3 bronze 0 total 4

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic// grand slams, world team cup

Medal target: -

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

Triathlon

High performance 3

High performance (Paralympic) 3

Total investment 2013–14: $2,731,400
(high performance: $2,160,000; high performance — para: $225,000; participation: $346,400)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 66.9%

The sport is on course to achieve its targets at the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2016, following good performances through 2013 and at the world triathlon grand final in London. There is strong depth on the women’s side of the sport and there have been some promising future signs for both men and women at the under-23 level. In the Hawaii Ironman, Australia maintained its fine tradition with a win in the women’s race and silver in the men’s race. There were some encouraging performances in para triathlon, including one world championship. The loss of some world-class coaches in 2013 remains a cause for concern and replacement strategies will need to be monitored throughout 2014.

Triathlon Australia (TA) currently meets a number of the mandatory sports governance principles. The aligned behaviours of the national body and state and territory associations ensures TA is well positioned to improve its governance rating in 2014 as it moves towards a whole-of-sport operating and governance structure.

TA continues to experience steady growth in full active membership and event participants, with 19 per cent increase across both categories. After a number of delays and extended piloting phase, the sport is scheduled to launch a junior participation product in early 2014.

2013 benchmark event // ITU Series Grand Final

Medal target: 0 to 2

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

2013 benchmark event - Paralympic// world championships

Medal target: 1 to 2

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Volleyball

High performance 3

Total investment 2013–14: $2,551,500
(high performance: $2,483,000; participation: $64,000; other: $4,500)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 66.4%

The improved performance of the men’s indoor team at the London 2012 Olympic Games demonstrated the advancements within the program. The appointment and retention of a world-class coach and participation in the world league in 2014 remain high priorities. In relation to the beach program, there were solid performances by the new pairings under a new targeted model. The progress of both indoor men and beach programs will be monitored closely in 2014 to assess their performance potential in the campaign to Rio 2016.

Volleyball Australia (VA) has undertaken a significant amount of governance reform over the past 12 months, working towards compliance with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. A move to a company limited by guarantee and an updated constitution based on the ASC’s recommendations was endorsed at the AGM in October 2013.

VA achieved growth across the majority of its membership categories during the year. The appointment of sport development officers within the member states contributed to this membership growth. Key issues to address in the coming year include creating a consistent national junior development program and a stronger club development structure.

2013 benchmark event // FIVB World Tour - beach, Asian Championships - indoor men

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Yes

Water Polo

High performance 3

Total investment 2013–14: $2,621,377
(high performance: $2,560,377; participation: $61,000)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 54.6%

The sport’s performances were in line with expectation in 2013, with the women achieving a silver medal and the men eighth place at the world championships in Barcelona. The result for the women’s team was especially encouraging given the turnover within the team since London. The men’s team achieved their top eight benchmark event target and were increasingly competitive, however were unabal to record any wins, against the top nations.

The Water Polo Australia (WPA) board has indicated it is receptive to governance changes in the areas where the organisation is not aligned with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. WPA continues to improve its organisational capability but additional support in areas such as participation, finance and commercialisation would allow further development of the sport.

WPA has experienced strong growth across its membership and exposure programs. The greatest increase in participation was seen in school-delivered programs.

2013 benchmark event // world championships - men, women

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

Weightlifting

High performance 1

Total investment 2013–14: $384,000
(high performance: $362,600; participation: $21,400)
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 39.2%

Australia did not participate in the 2013 world weightlifting championships. The sport instead focused on preparations for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, where it is targeting multiple medal performances — including up to two gold medals. The results at the 2013 Commonwealth Championships suggest gold medal performances at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games will be difficult to obtain. While the high performance strategy and planning for future success are sound, the performance profile of the sport for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games has declined.

In the last 12 months the Australian Weightlifting Federation (AWF) has transferred to a company limited by guarantee and achieved improved alignment with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. Further areas for reform include establishing a nominations committee, instituting annual board performance reviews and improving gender balance on the board.

The majority of AWF’s resources are directed towards high performance and participation rates in the sport are low.

2013 benchmark event // Commonwealth Championships

Medal target: 4 to 6

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 2 total 3

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