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The tally

The Sports Tally provides an annual health check on sports that receive Australia’s Winning Edge
funding. This information has been derived from the Annual Sports Performance Review (ASPR)
process. Each sport’s high performance progress has been given an overall rating and commentary has
been included for high performance and governance. In addition, each sport’s performance has been
highlighted through the 2015 benchmark event target and actual results.
The overall high performance rating considers each sport against its annual benchmark event
performance, future potential and health of the sport’s high performance system. The sport-specifi c
information and evidence is provided and reviewed in collaboration with national sporting organisations
and the National Institute Network (NIN) through the:
>  high performance planning and reporting template
>  2015 benchmark event reports
>  2015 ASPR
>  2015 performance summary report.

The tally key


underperforming significantly below expectation; solutions to challenges not identified

underperforming

progressing evidence of improvement; solutions to challenges being implemented

progresssing

on track working well across key areas; on target

on track

performing performing well in all areas; above target

performing

excelling exceptional performance; setting a standard for others to aspire

excelling

Comparison ranking - each sport will have a comparison ranking compared to the previous year (2013). This will provide an honest assessment of how each sport has performed over the year in comparison to the previous year.

Arrow up = up Arrow down = down Equal state = same

Investment - the total ASC Investment and the ASC funding as a percentage of total income has been outlined for each sport. The percentage is calculated as total ASC Investment 2014-15 divided by the national sporting organisation's total forecast revenue for their current financial year as at 31 December 2014.

Non-medal target - in all cases where no medal has been forecast or where the lower end of a medal range is zero, a non-medal target is agreed. For example, fourth place or a quarter final.

Y = yes   N = no

The sports

Archery

Total investment 2014–15: $628,000 (high performance: $600,800; participation: $27,200)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 49%

Archery Australia’s high performance program had a positive year in 2014. The appointment of a head coach and high performance manager at the end of 2013 has enhanced the coordination and oversight of the high performance program and has positively impacted the ability of archery to meet its high performance targets.

The men’s team and men’s individual events remain the key focus for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games after exceeding their targets at World Cup 1, 2014 in China. Ryan Tyack also won gold at the 2014 World Indoor Archery Championships.

governance

When benchmarked against other Australia’s Winning Edge sports — Archery Australia falls below in a number of areas against the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles.  Archery Australia has indicated a willingness to pursue governance changes appropriate to the size of the organisation to increase the benchmark standard.

2014 benchmark event // world cup

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Y

Athletics

Total investment 2014–15: $8,931,400 (high performance: $6,520,000; high performance - para: $1,630,000; participation: $246,400; other: $535,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 73%

The Athletics Australia high performance program has been rated as progressing, while the para-athletics program has been rated as on track. The highly publicised departure of the Athletics Australia national head coach during the Glasgow Commonwealth Games was poorly timed and unhelpful for the sport’s image. Despite this distraction there were solid performances from a number of athletes — including Sally Pearson, Kimberley Mickle, Alana Boyd, Michael Shelley and Dani Samuels.
 
The Athletics Australia and ASC reviews following the Commonwealth Games reflect the wide-ranging challenges across the sport. It is expected the outcomes and recommendations of the reviews will provide athletics with a positive and productive way forward. The high performance unit at Athletics Australia continues to develop and implement strategies to improve the accountability, monitoring and coordination of support to its athletes. The sport is pursuing the appointment of a new head coach and performance services manager as a matter of urgency, with both roles being critical to achieving high performance outcomes in the future. There are a number of promising emerging athletes with podium potential, and this year’s world championships will provide insight into the performance potential in the pre-Olympic and Paralympic year.

Athletics is regarded to be on track to achieve its Rio 2016 targets.

governance

When assessed against the ASC’s mandatory governance principles there are key areas, including strategic alignment, single entity and board performance evaluation, where Athletics Australia requires further work. This is reflected in the findings of the panel that conducted the One Sport — The Future Course independent review.

A critical issue is shifting from a board of management to a board of governance, including significantly streamlining the committee structure, and building much higher levels of alignment and shared national direction across the entire sport. Athletics Australia and the ASC have implemented an athletics review monitoring committee, which will monitor progress and identify resource needs to support implementation of the review’s recommendations.

2014 benchmark event // Commonwealth Games

Medal target: 12 to 20

Actual: gold 6 silver 0 bronze 3 total 9

2014 Paralympic benchmark event // Commonwealth Games

Medal target: 5 to 7

Actual: gold 2 silver 1 bronze 0 total 3

Australian Paralympic Committee managed sport

Total investment 2014–15: $5,125,000 — this includes $2,520,522 for APC operations,
$300,000 for classification activities, $400,000 for DAS (retained by ASC), $1,664,478 for Paralympic sports managed by the APC and $240,000 in other funding.

In addition, $4,358,125 is provided to the APC to fund the 12 mainstreamed Paralympic sports (see individual sport reports).

As well as overseeing the preparation of the Australian team for the Paralympic Games and delivery of cross-sector programs, the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC) directly manages five high performance programs:

  • Wheelchair rugby — 2014 saw the Australian team win the world title in a well-planned campaign. The program continues to be reviewed regularly to ensure continued improvement; its use of research and innovation continues to lead the way in wheelchair sports and contributes greatly to the program’s success.
  • Powerlifting — the powerlifting program’s results in 2014 indicate the sport is unlikely to contribute to Australia’s Paralympic Games medal targets in 2016. There are currently few international  athletes in the system, the high performance pathway is not sufficient to increase the depth of athletes, and the program is poorly resourced.
  • Boccia — the sport made good progress in developing its high performance program during 2014.   This included establishing a well-supported high performance training centre for key athletes through a partnership between the APC, University of Queensland and Cerebal Palsy Alliance in NSW. While boccia only has a narrow prospect of contributing to the 2016 medal targets, there is a development strategy in place for 2020.
  • Goalball — the Australian women’s goalball team finished equal 9th at the 2014 world championships. The sport’s results in 2014 indicate it is unlikely to contribute to Australia’s medal targets in 2016. Considerable work is required on underpinning structures to ensure the sport can achieve high performance outcomes at future Games.
  • Winter sports — at the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games the Australian team finished 19th, with two bronze medals. While this was within the expected total of 2–5 medals, it was at the low end of the range. The Australian team did not achieve the predicted one gold medal. Following a detailed Australia’s Winning Edge performance case review, the AIS considers a target of 1–2 gold and 5–7 total medals is achievable for the 2018 Paralympic Winter Games. Building the number of high performance athletes in the Australian system is a key action for the 2018 Games cycle.

governance

The APC has been slow to adopt governance reform identified 12 months ago. While there has been agreement to adopt a number of areas within the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles, there is much work to be done achieving governance reform.

Wheelchair rugby — 2014 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Boccia — 2014 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved:N

Goalball — 2014 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships (women)

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Winter sports — 2014 Paralympic benchmark event  // Paralympic Winter Games

Medal target: 2 to 5

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 2 total 2

Badminton

Total investment 2014–15: $797,000 (high performance: $540,000; participation: $177,000; other: $80,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 25%

Badminton Australia has been rated as progressing, with performance outcomes below target in 2014. There are a number of very promising pathway athletes that Badminton Australia believes are genuine medal prospects for 2018 and beyond; however, medal performances in the short term are unlikely.

The centralised program out of Melbourne remains a key ingredient of the program. The sport continues to challenge itself and is implementing a new coaching and service support structure so there is efficient and effective use of resources. Some of the priorities include: new partnerships with the Indonesian, Chinese and Malaysian national training centres; a new Victorian Institute of Sport (VIS) partnership for strength and conditioning; and focused support for athletes most likely to meet the program aims.

governance

When benchmarked against other Australia’s Winning Edge sports, Badminton Australia falls below in a number of areas. Badminton Australia is continuing to work through constitutional reform, which will improve its ability to deliver national programs and products and increase the benchmark standard.

2014 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target:

Non-medal target achieved: Y

Basketball

Total investment 2014–15: $6,945,700 (high performance: $4,780,000; high performance – para: $1,075,000; participation: $716,400; other: $374,300)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 70%
Basketball Australia has been rated as progressing for both Olympic and Paralympic disciplines. Basketball Australia’s high performance programs are led by quality head coaches who have targeted the required changes in culture in the first two years of the Olympiad. This resulted in mixed outcomes in terms of 2014 benchmark event targets; the Opals and Rollers met their targets with bronze and gold medals respectively but the Boomers and Gliders missed their targets. Anthony Moore commenced as CEO of Basketball Australia in October 2014 and has board approval to implement an organisation-wide restructure (to be implemented in the first quarter of 2015).

governance
Basketball Australia has finalised required constitutional changes needed to implement the mandatory sports governance principles. Basketball Australia is largely compliant with the principles, with some key areas being worked on including board performance evaluations. With new leadership Basketball Australia has an opportunity to drive further cultural and behavioural change across the sport, which will enable it to maximise the advantage of a large and vibrant participation base.

2014 benchmark event // world championships (men)

Medal target:

Non-medal target achieved: N

2014 benchmark event - // world championships (women)

Medal target:1

Actual: gold0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

2014 Paralympic benchmark event - // world championships

Medal target:2

Actual: gold1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Bowls

Total investment 2014–15: $1,514,000 (high performance: $667,200; participation:
$546,800; other: $300,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 21%
Bowls Australia has been rated as on track. While bowls’ overall medal target for the Glasgow Commonwealth Games was achieved (minimum of four medals), the sport was disappointed not to  achieve the gold medal target (2–3). Some athletes struggled with the slower conditions and took too long adapting to what was required to produce a golden result.
Bowls Australia conducted an extensive high performance review following Glasgow, with a number of recommendations to enhance the capabilities of future teams. While the conditions may not have favoured the Australian team, it is worth noting that the next three major tournaments (the 2015 Asia Pacific Championships, 2016 world championships and 2018 Commonwealth Games) are all being played on the faster New Zealand and Australian greens.

The bowls program continues to build on its high performance culture within the daily training environment. The likely introduction of the AIS Athlete Management System in 2015 will also enable greater athlete accountability in their ongoing development.

The program continues to produce world-class bowlers, and with greater athlete accountability and direction from the head coach the sport will remain on track to achieve benchmark event targets through to 2018. The program is confident of achieving its targets at the 2016 world championships.

governance

Bowls Australia remains proactive in increasing its alignment with the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles, and performs well when benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports. Bowls Australia is conducting a governance scan and board evaluation of the members to assist in strengthening governance across the sport.

2014 benchmark event - // Commonwealth Games

Medal target:4 to 7

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 3 total 4

Boxing

Total investment 2014–15: $944,000 (high performance: $850,000; participation:
$54,000; other: $40,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 46%

Boxing Australia exceeded its medal targets at the 2014 Commonwealth Games (two gold and one silver medal), with gold medallist Shelley Watts also making the quarterfinals at the women’s world championships. This has resulted in the sport being rated as progressing.
The quality of the daily training environments of the majority of Boxing Australia’s Australia’s Winning Edge-categorised athletes has improved since the finalisation of its national coaching structure. To create a more optimum environment, Shelley Watts and Daniel Lewis are relocating to the AIS in Canberra to spend more time with the head coach and relevant service providers.

There was an increase in the number and quality of centralised training opportunities in 2014 — including international training camps with Scotland, Vietnam, the Philippines and Brazil — and a pre-Commonwealth Games training phase held in Ireland.

Qualification for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games will be more difficult than previous campaigns, with athletes now primarily having to qualify through Asia. This will likely mean a reduced number of boxers competing in Rio than at previous Games.

governance
Boxing is continuing to progress its governance in line with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles after achieving significant change following the 2011 whole of sport review.


 

2014 benchmark event // world championships (women)

Medal target: 0 to 1

Non-medal target achieved: Y

Canoeing

Total investment 2014–15: $5,086,000 (high performance: $4,700,000; high performance – para: $225,000; participation: $108,000; other: $53,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 70%
Australian Canoeing has been rated as progressing (Olympic) and on track (Paralympic). Canoe slalom met its Australia’s Winning Edge target with a gold medal in the women’s K1 event at the world championships, which was complemented by a promising fifth place in the men’s event. However, beyond these performances — and an Olympic qualifying standard in the men’s C1 — few athletes met their targets/expectations at this event.

The sprint program fell short of its Australia’s Winning Edge targets for the 2014 world championships. There were nonetheless some valuable lessons learnt and positive results by younger athletes, including  a silver medal for a new men’s K2 1000 combination and an impressive performance by a new women’s K2 combination, which is closing in on the podium. The sport believes it is on target for its Rio 2016 goals, but achieving this will require a great deal of work.

Australian Canoeing has made significant cultural shifts this year, particularly in the areas of planning, assessment and review. This includes close athlete monitoring after acknowledging that a tighter focus and rigor around operations is needed to win medals in Rio.

para-canoe
Para-canoe will make its debut in Rio as the sport continues to grow worldwide. Two debutants at the 2014 world championships secured medals in Paralympic events (gold and a bronze), with five of the six team members improving and/or exceeding expectations. This was preceded by a successful joint training camp with the able-bodied sprint team at the AIS European Training Centre in Varese, Italy. The final para- canoe program for Rio 2016 poses a threat to Australian medal chances, with the V1 event being replaced by another kayak event in which Australian Canoeing is untested.

governance
The sport has begun a process to adopt company limited by guarantee status, including changes to its constitution which will align it to the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles (to be adopted by July 2015). Australian Canoeing recently undertook a board and executive performance review, which has provided a set of recommendations to achieve better practice in its governance system. With the adoption of these recommendations and the new constitution, Australian Canoeing will move closer to achieving compliance against the governance principles.

2014 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2 to 4

Actual: gold1 silver 1 bronze 0 total 2

2014 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1 to 2

Actual: gold1 silver 0 bronze 1 total 2

 

Cycling

Total investment 2014–15: $9,482,500 (high performance: $7,360,000; high performance – para: $1,120,000; participation: $592,500; other: $410,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 53%

Cycling Australia has been rated as on track for both the Olympic and Paralympic disciplines. Performances in 2014 across road, track and BMX were encouraging at both the elite and underpinning age-group levels. The various Olympic and Paralympic disciplines are currently expected to be key contributors to cycling’s Australia’s Winning Edge targets.

The para-cycling squad exceeded the medal target at the 2014 track world championships and met the medal target at the road world championships. A key focus for the next two years will be to expand on those levels of performance, as other nations also increase their focus on the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Cycling Australia’s high performance unit works hard at cultivating a performance focus within the wider financial challenges of the national sporting organisation. It should be noted that the financial challenges of the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) nations qualification process are a concern and could threaten a sustainable athlete pathway strategy towards Rio and beyond.

Recently, Australia has its most successful world championships since Melbourne 2012, Australia finished top of the medal tally with 11 medals (four gold, four silver and three bronze). Australia's world titles came from the women's team, pursuit quartet, Rebecca Wiasak in the individual pursuit, in addition to Anna Meares and Annette Edmondson.

governance

Cycling Australia has undergone significant governance reform during 2014, including transitioning to a company limited by guarantee and adopting a new constitution that will allow it to be fully compliant with the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles. A new skills-based board has also been elected, and Cycling Australia will continue to implement necessary governance reform during 2015. 

2014 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 5 to 8

Actual: gold 2 silver 2 bronze 2 total 6

2014 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 12 to 16

Actual: gold 9 silver 6 bronze 7 total 22

Diving

Total investment 2014–15: $2,390,200 (high performance: $2,115,000; participation:
$27,200; other: $248,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 89%

Diving Australia has been rated as on track. Diving Australia performed well in 2014, achieving above target performances at the benchmark events — the world cup in Shanghai and world junior championships in Penza — and reaching its target at the Commonwealth Games. Leading diver Melissa Wu returned to form and was joined by younger divers Georgia Sheehan, Maddison Keeney and Lara Tarvit, who won medals at the world juniors and world cup.

Diving Australia has introduced significant changes to its program. This has included adding a focused national synchro program and two extra domestic dive events, and expanding from one high performance centre to three — led by a national coach with international medal-winning experience. This restructure necessitates Diving Australia to realign the contributions needed from high performance staff and stakeholders more closely to the Australia’s Winning Edge target outcomes for Rio.

Diving Australia is actively seeking opportunities in the talent pathways area, such as refining the current talent identification and development (TID) processes to link with proposed talent transfer mechanisms. It is also working with Gymnastics Australia (‘Spin to Win’) and to enhance state sporting organisation involvement.

governance
When benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports, Diving Australia has some areas that are below standard. Diving is continuing to address these areas, including the introduction of a nominations committee, which will move it closer to achieving the benchmark.

 

2014 benchmark event // world cup

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 2 total 2

Equestrian

Total investment 2014–15: $3,092,000 (high performance: $2,140,000; high performance – para: $500,000; participation: $337,000; other: $115,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 49%

Equestrian Australia has been rated as progressing for both the Olympic and Paralympic disciplines. The 2014 benchmark events for both Olympic and Paralympic programs was to medal at the World Equestrian Games (WEG); unfortunately neither program was able to meet the medal targets. However, a positive outcome from the WEG was the qualification of the eventing team for the Rio Olympic Games, which will enable athletes to focus on developing combinations. Australia was unable to do this at the equivalent event leading in to London 2012.

A thorough review of the high performance program conducted post-WEG identified necessary changes to the structure within the high performance programs. It also generated critical recommendations to be implemented, which will enable the required performance shift to meet the medal targets in Rio. These changes and recommendations are supported by the CEO and the board.

Equestrian Australia is continuing to pursue opportunities with the Australian Sports Foundation.

governance
Equestrian Australia has progressed against the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles and shown willingness to continue enhancing its governance. Equestrian Australia is working to streamline key areas across the entire sport, which will assist it to achieve benchmark standards.

 

2014 benchmark event // World Equestrian Games

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

2014 Paralympic benchmark event // World Equestrian Games

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Football

Total investment 2014–15: $3,121,000 (high performance: $1,950,000; participation: $916,000; other: $255,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 3%

Football Federation Australia (FFA) has been rated as progressing. The Matildas’ qualification for the 2015 World Cup in Canada reflects good progress by the team; however, it is recognised that Olympic qualification will be difficult. Newly appointed coach Alen Stajcic is working with the WLeague franchises and is optimistic they will engage and be aligned to the national program, Olympic qualification and national squad athlete development.

The Olyroos — the national under-23 men’s team — will commence their Olympic qualification preparations in early 2015. The recent performance by the Socceroos winning their maiden Asian Cup title was highly commended.

governance
FFA has implemented a sound governance structure that is in line with the majority of the ASC governance principles. Over the coming 12 months FFA will implement a whole of football strategic plan, which will assist it in achieving key cultural changes.

2014 benchmark event // 2014 AFC Under - 22 championship (men)

Medal target: 0

Non-medal target achieved: Y

2014 benchmark event // Asian Cup (women)

Medal target: 0

Non-medal target achieved: Y

Golf

Total investment 2014–15: $1,761,600 (high performance: $1,010,000; participation: $501,600; other: $250,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 13%
Golf Australia has been rated as performing. While Australia’s Winning Edge athletes failed to win a major  in 2014, there are positive signs that indicate they are on track for Rio 2016 targets. Unlike other individual sports, golf athletes ranked in the top 50 world rankings are more than capable of winning PGA events and major tournaments.

In 2014 Australians achieved one podium, four 4–8 finishes and five 9–16 finishes at the majors, on top of Jason Day, John Senden, Matthew Jones, Steve Bowditch and Adam Scott winning events on the US PGA Tour. Karrie Webb also enjoyed success on the LPGA Tour. Australia currently has two male golfers in the top 10 world rankings and four in the top 50. While Karrie Webb is currently the lone female in the top 10, there are good indications that both Minjee Lee and Su Oh will climb the rankings in 2015 after recently turning professional.
The state-based high performance programs are aligned with the national program, ensuring quality daily training environments and service support for all identified athletes. The pathway continues to provide high-quality athletes with strong skill sets to enable them to achieve in the professional ranks.

governance

When benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports, Golf Australia is performing well against the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles. Golf Australia is investigating a new model of management and governance structure to be adopted across the sport to further improve its performance. Golf Australia now only requires small changes to its governance to exceed the benchmark standard.

2014 benchmark event // championship events

Medal target: 1 to 2

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

Gymnastics

Total investment 2014–15: $3,418,971 (high performance: $2,372,971; participation: $816,000; other: $230,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 46%
Gymnastics Australia has been rated as progressing. At the 2014 Commonwealth Games gymnastics fell well short of its medal targets, winning four medals and no gold. However, at the world championships the women’s artistic gymnastics team placed seventh and Larrissa Miller came sixth in the floor exercise. These results suggest there is some potential for medals in Rio.

A challenge for Gymnastics Australia’s national high performance program has been the varied level  of influence it has on state-based high performance programs. Consequently, Gymnastics Australia is implementing significant changes to the structure of its women’s and men’s artistic gymnastics national programs, which will focus more resources on a smaller number of high performance centres. This concentration and alignment of resources is expected to significantly improve the levels of accountability in the targeted centres, improve the collaboration between national and state technical staff, and increase the performance support provided to targeted gymnasts.

governance

Gymnastics Australia is performing well in adopting the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles. A new chair was elected in May 2014 and the organisation needs to conduct some work in chair succession planning. Gymnastics Australia’s disclosure of executive salaries and associated expenses remains an area for improvement. The ASC is currently conducting board evaluations on the national and state bodies to review governance practices across the sport.

2014 benchmark event // world championship

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target achieved: Y

Hockey

Total investment 2014–15: $6,736,800 (high performance: $5,840,000; participation: $661,800; other: $235,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 73%

Hockey Australia has been rated as on track. The men’s 2014 world cup campaign was well-planned and executed by a group of skilled an experienced staff and players. The team defeated reigning Olympic silver medallist the Netherlands in the final to retain the world number one ranking, and was awarded the Player and Young Player of the Tournament awards.

Mental and physical fitness are key attributes of the men’s squad. This is underpinned by the centralised training at the national centre in Perth. Integral to the success of the men’s hockey team was iconic coach Richard Charlesworth – a player and coach whose career spanned over 35 years. Richard retired in 2014 after a gold medal   at the men’s world cup. In addition the world cup event saw the retirement of two senior and heavily capped players. Seven weeks after their world cup success the men’s team won gold at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games.

The women’s world cup campaign was also meticulously planned, with additional matches arranged in   Europe to give the athletes exposure to various styles of play. The team’s silver medal was above expectations and – in a testament to their progress – they also won gold at the Commonwealth Games.

Both the men’s and women’s teams are on track for their Rio 2016 targets.

governance

Hockey Australia continued to progress in line with the mandatory sports governance principles in 2014, including completing a board evaluation, adopting appropriate systems to manage conflicts of interest and establishing an audit and risk committee. Hockey Australia disclosure of executive salaries and associated expenses remains an area for improvement.
 

2014 benchmark event // world cup (men)

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

2014 benchmark event // world cup (women)

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

Judo

Total investment 2014–15: $684,000 (high performance: $667,800; participation: $16,200)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 64%

Judo Federation Australia is going through a significant transition phase and has been rated as underperforming. It recently employed its first CEO, undertook a governance review, had a significant turnover of board directors and reviewed its high performance program in the wake of recent benchmark event results.

Before this process, judo was experiencing significant governance and leadership issues that heavily impacted the high performance program. The reforms better position the sport to review its subsequent staff structure, specifically around high performance. In particular, reviewing and solidifying the high performance coaching structure and enhancing the daily training environment of key athletes remain critical to any future high performance success in the sport.

governance

In 2014 the Judo Federation Australia went through some major transitions as a sport, with significant change in board personnel and the creation of a new CEO position. An ASC-led governance review has now been completed and has provided the Judo Federation Australia with a pathway to improved corporate governance, organisational stability and an improved culture to drive performance. The implementation of the recommendations made in the governance review and increased diversification of the Judo Federation Australia board are critical priorities for the sport’s sustainable success.

2014 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved:          N

Netball

Total investment 2014–15: $3,379,900 (high performance: $2,065,000; participation: 979,900; other: $335,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 21%
Netball had a stellar year on and off the court and has been rated as performing. The Diamonds won gold at the Commonwealth Games, successfully defended the Constellation Cup and finished the year on a 19-game winning streak. They are also leading the way in creating and implementing quality plans and processes.

The Netball Australia high performance program has increased in sophistication over the last couple of years; however, there is still scope and plans to improve on the national system and unity of purpose.

governance

Netball Australia is performing extremely well in its governance. With a whole of sport approach to governance improvement, Netball Australia is a high-performing governance benchmark in many areas, particularly accountability, transparency and continuous improvement.

2014 benchmark event // Commonwealth Games

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Olympic Winter Institute of Australia

Total investment 2014–15: $2,738,645 (high performance: $2,573,645; other: 165,000) 
                
ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 69%
The Olympic Winter Institute of Australia has been rated as progressing. At the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games, Australian athletes won two silver medals and one bronze. While this result was within the forecast total medal range, the team failed to win the predicted one gold medal. Following a detailed post-Games Australia’s Winning Edge performance case review, the AIS considers a target of 1–2 gold medals and –5 total medals is achievable at the 2018 Olympic Winter Games. This is based on a large, young cohort of high-potential athletes in disciplines where Australia has a history of success.

Twelve new events were added to the Olympic program in Sochi — eight in Australia’s priority sports of freestyle skiing and snowboard. The planned new Australian-based water jump and half-pipe facility projects are both experiencing delays; however, when completed these facilities will provide athletes with improved training opportunities in priority disciplines.
The four medals, including two gold won at the 2015 Ski and Snowboard World Championships, indicate that the high performance program is tracking well towards its 2018 objectives.

governance
The ASC notes that the Olympic Winter Institute of Australia is not yet required to implement the mandatory governance principles. In saying this, the ASC recognises the unique structure of the Olympic Winter Institute of Australia in operating programs for a number of sports, which means that implementation of aspects of the mandatory governance principles would require adaptation. It also  notes that while the principles are developed with NSO businesses in mind, they represent accepted good governance practice that is relevant to many types of organisations operating in the sport sector.

The Olympic Winter Institute of Australia has demonstrated a strong commitment to best practice governance arrangements. As a recipient of significant public investment, the ASC sees an opportunity for the Olympic Winter Institute of Australia to also leverage the principles for continuous improvement.

2014 benchmark event // Sochi Olympic Winter Games

Medal target: 2 to 4

Actual: gold 0 silver 2 bronze 1 total 3

Rowing

Total investment 2014–15: $8,454,400 (high performance: $7,400,000; high performance – para: $480,000; participation: $89,400; other: $485,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 69%

Rowing Australia has been rated as progressing (Olympic) and performing (Paralympic). Rowing Australia did not meet its 2014 world championships gold medal target in Olympic-class boats. While there is some caution around this result, there is evidence that with eight boats finishing in the top five — and four of them with medals — rowing is positioned to achieve its Rio 2016 targets.

The challenge for 2015 is to convert existing medals to gold, and the fourth and fifth placings to medals. There is a watching brief on this for 2015, with Rowing Australia needing to clearly set out the steps it is taking to improve the benchmark event performances of its Olympic-category boats.

In para-rowing events, Australia finished at the top of the world championships medal table for a second successive year, with gold medals in the men’s single sculls and mixed double sculls Paralympic-class boats. The challenge for 2015 is to develop the mixed four as a third medal-potential boat.

governance
After successfully implementing required governance reform, Rowing Australia is working with its member associations on driving governance evolution at the state level. A significant challenge is alignment of data collection across Rowing Australia and its member associations.

2014 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target:3 to 5

Actual: gold0 silver 1 bronze3 total 4

2014 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1 to 2

Actual: gold 2 silver0 bronze 0 total 2

Rugby 7s, Rugby Union

Total investment 2014–15: $1,926,000 (high performance: $1,040,000; participation: $666,000; other: $220,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 2%
Australian Rugby Union's (ARU) 7s program has been rated as progressing (men) and on track (women). The women’s and men’s teams improved significantly in the 2014 International Rugby Board (IRB) series. The women’s team finished second to world champions New Zealand, and the team’s 2–2 win/loss record in finals makes them a gold medal prospect for Rio 2016. The men’s team won a bronze medal at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games and are improving; however, they will need to continue this trajectory to meet their Rio medal expectations.

There were significant leadership changes to the ARU’s 7s program during 2014. A men’s coach was recruited before Glasgow for the new role of national director of Australian 7s and men’s 7s head coach. These changes have provided greater direction and involvement for the 7s program staff. Since centralising both programs in January 2014, the teams have improved in all areas.

The AIS assisted ARU 7s with a performance preparation review to identify gaps to becoming world class in this new environment. These outcomes are being implemented by ARU 7s to fully utilise the opportunities of centralisation. At the end of 2014 the program replaced the lead men’s strength and conditioning coach and rehabilitation specialist, as well as recruiting lead physiotherapists for both the men’s and women’s programs.

AIS and ARU 7s have started an AIS Talent Transfer program, which is looking for new female talent to feed the program. The ARU has also expanded competitions and coach development areas since last year.

The AIS/Competitive Innovation-funded RF tracking instruments have been installed. The program is now positioned to study the tactical and physical aspects of the game, benefitting the Australian players in Narrabeen and visiting nations as they seek a greater understanding of the demands of the game and the gaps to world class.

governance
The ARU had a governance review conducted in 2012 and has continued to work towards adopting the recommendations. It is performing well in adopting the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles and with further changes will meet the benchmark standard.

2014 benchmark event // IRB series (men)

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Y

2014 benchmark event // IRB series (women)

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Y

Sailing

Total investment 2014–15: $9,221,400 (high performance: $7,550,000; high performance – para: $705,000; participation: $546,400; other: $420,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 70%

Sailing Australia has been rated as performing (Olympic) and on track (Paralympic). Sailing achieved  its 2014 high performance benchmark event targets and continues to work with targeted athletes on improvement across all aspects of their performance.

The sport’s involvement at the Rio 2016 test event held in 2014 identified areas for improvement in the lead-in to the Games, with these areas being focused on and trialed at test events in 2015. The national training centre at Middle Harbour was completed and opened during 2014 and provides both Olympic and Paralympic programs with a world-class training venue. Matt Carroll commenced with Yachting Australia as CEO on 24 November 2014 following the resignation of Phil Jones.

governance
Yachting Australia built on its solid foundation of good governance with important reform in 2014. This included transitioning to a company limited by guarantee, approving the introduction of one management model and positioning Yachting Australia as a leader in the governance space from a national alignment perspective.

2014 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 3 to 6

Actual: gold 1 silver 1bronze 2 total 4

2014 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1 to 2

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 1 total 2

Shooting

Total investment 2014–15: $2,366,200 (high performance: $1,960,000; high performance – para: $295,000; participation: $76,200; other: $35,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 91%
Shooting Australia has been rated as on track (Olympic) and progressing (Paralympic). Shooting Australia had a great 2014 international season, exceeding its medal targets at the Commonwealth Games (six gold and two bronze medals) and world championships (one gold and one bronze medal in Olympic disciplines). Warren Potent was the standout performer, winning gold at both the world championships and Commonwealth Games in the men’s 50-metre rifle prone event. The para-shooting program, despite having the best world cup season ever in terms of medals won, failed to win a medal at the 2014 world championships.

Shooting Australia has been transitioning to a selection model that better aligns to Australia’s Winning Edge and is based on current and future performance potential, rather than filling quotas. This is a big cultural shift for the sport, with a much heavier focus on performance outcomes and opportunities as opposed to selection. The introduction of individual performance plans and more engagement in a prescribed daily training environment has emphasised this shift, with a greater level of accountability now in the system.

governance
Shooting Australia continues to progress its governance in line with the ASC’s sports governance principles, completing a board evaluation with the ASC during 2014. The implementation of the recommendations — such as improving alignment across the shooting sports and increasing the size and diversity of the board — should be priorities for Shooting Australia.

2014 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 1 total 2

2014 Paralympic benchmark event // IPC world championships

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target achieved: Y

Ski and Snowboard

Total investment 2014–15: $971,500 (high performance: $767,600; participation: $16,400; other: $187,500)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 44%
Ski and Snowboard Australia has been rated as progressing. At the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games, Australian athletes won two silver medals and one bronze. While this result was within the forecast   total medal range, the team failed to win the predicted one gold medal. Following a detailed post-Games Australia’s Winning Edge performance case review, the AIS considers a target of 1–2 gold medals and  3–5 total medals is achievable at the 2018 Olympic Winter Games. This is based on a large, young cohort of high-potential athletes in disciplines where Australia has a history of success.

Twelve new events were added to the Olympic program in Sochi — eight in Australia’s priority sports of freestyle skiing and snowboard. The planned new Australian-based water jump and half-pipe facility projects are both experiencing delays; however, when completed these facilities will provide athletes with improved training opportunities in priority disciplines.

The four medals, including two gold, won at the 2015 Ski and Snowboard World Championships indicate that the high performance program is tracking well towards its 2018 objectives.

governance
Ski and Snowboard Australia is largely compliant with the ASC’s mandatory governance principles. It has indicated willingness to further develop and implement these principles throughout 2015.

2014 benchmark event // Sochi Olympic Winter Games

Medal target: 2 to 4

Actual: gold 0 silver 2 bronze 1 total 3

Squash

Total investment 2014–15: $948,400 (high performance: $600,000; participation: $118,400; other: $230,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 56%
Squash Australia has been rated as progressing. Squash achieved its Commonwealth Games targets of two gold medals and one bronze. The high performance program has made significant progress in a number of areas during 2014, including rationalising international competitions opportunities; redirecting funds to complement elite athlete pathway and competitions; and greater resource allocation to underpinning programs.

governance

When benchmarked against other Australia’s Winning Edge sports, Squash Australia has some areas below standard which need to be addressed. With continued governance improvements it will meet further benchmark standards.

2014 benchmark event // Commonwealth Games

Medal target: 2 to 4

Actual: gold 2 silver 0 bronze 1 total 3

Surf life saving

Total investment 2014–15: $952,000 (high performance: $200,000; participation: $411,600; other: $340,400)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 4%
Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) has been rated as progressing. After being defeated as overall point-score champions for the first time at the 2012 world championships, SLSA put in place a focused campaign for 2014. This was part of a restructure of the high performance program, including a new high performance team.

Although the target of winning the world championships was not achieved, post-event analysis has shown a significant reversal of downwards performance trends and a narrowing of the gap. The establishment of  a more structured system — along with the success of the junior team in 2014 — augers well for Australia to achieve the target of being the number one nation in 2016.

SLSA remains a key player in the talent transfer of athletes into the Olympic pathway for canoeing and open water swimming, with policy agreements and programs in place that will achieve mutually beneficial outcomes.

governance
SLSA has continued to improve its governance following a major external review in 2012. When benchmarked against other Australia’s Winning Edge sports, SLSA has shown to be comparable to other sports. With continued improvements it will further meet benchmark standards.

2014 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

Surfing

Total investment 2014–15: $1,789,118 (high performance: $925,000; participation: $586,600; other: $277,518)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 34% 
Surfing Australia has been rated as excelling. The 2014 women’s surfing world tour saw three Australians — Stephanie Gilmore, Tyler Wright and Sally Fitzgibbons — in the running for the title. Gilmore did enough in the last event to win her sixth world title, holding off Wright who repeated her second-place performance from 2013. Fitzgibbons slipped off the podium into fourth place.

The men’s event came down to the last event of the year. Australian Mick Fanning was in contention but unfortunately was unable to chase down the young Brazilian Gabriel Medina, who won his first world title and the first for his country. Joel Parkinson was also in podium contention until the last event but eventually placed sixth. Overall, Australia had four of the top 10 surfers in the world. Like in the women’s event, Australia finished with four of the top 10 surfers in the world.

Surfing Australia’s high performance program continues to play a significant role in the success of Australian surfers on the world stage. The support offered at seven of the events and the ever-expanding services provided by the high performance centre has been critical in maintaining Australia’s status as the number one surfing nation worldwide.

governance

Surfing Australia has continued to work towards adopting the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles and performs well in most areas when benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports. With continued changes in some areas it will progress well towards achieving the benchmark.

2014 benchmark event // world tour

Medal target: 3 to 4

Actual: gold 1 silver 2 bronze 0 total 3

Swimming

Total investment 2014–15: $11,886,000 (high performance: $8,415,000; high performance – para: $1,910,000; participation: $616,000; other: $945,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 44%

Swimming Australia has been rated as on track for both Olympic and Paralympic disciplines. Swimming now has a high-quality high performance team in place and is working hard to address and track its progress. Swimmers and coaches have plans in place for Rio 2016, and the developing podium performance centres will allow Swimming Australia to quality-assure and better influence the daily training environment of the swimmers.

The results across pool, open water and Paralympic events continued to improve during 2014, with Australia dominating at the Commonwealth Games and placing a strong second to the US at the Pan Pacs. While there continues to be a reliance on a small number of swimmers, results from relays as well as six number one world ranked individuals indicate improvements in depth.

Paralympic swimming has made similar progress though at a slightly slower pace. There are fewer podium centres than the Olympic group, two as apposed to 14, and consequently there are fewer swimmers in the centres. Several new faces made the podium at the Para Pan Pacific Games.

governance

Swimming Australia is progressing well against both the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles and the recommendations in the 2012 independent review. The turnaround in governance performance over the last two years has been significant. 

2014 benchmark event // Commonwealth Games

Medal target: 53 to 55 (able and para combined)

Actual: gold 17 silver 20 bronze15 total 52

Table Tennis

Total investment 2014–15: $672,000 (high performance – para: $290,000; participation: $198,200; other: $183,800)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 66%
Table Tennis Australia has been rated as on track. The 2014 performances of Australian athletes were encouraging, with Melissa Tapper winning a bronze at the world championships (an Australian first) and Sam Von Einem rising to world number three in his first full year of international competition.

Table Tennis Australia is working well across key areas and is focused on growing its opportunities for capturing new athletes, including ongoing work with the Australian Paralympic Committee on athlete profiling and identification.

governance
Table Tennis Australia has been working towards governance reforms following assistance by the ASC in 2011. A timetable with issues to be addressed was developed and Table Tennis Australia has been undertaking these reforms in order to meet the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles.

2014 Paralympic benchmark event // world para championships

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

Triathlon

Total investment 2014–15: $2,811,400 (high performance: $2,160,000; high performance – para: $225,000; participation: $346,400; other: $80,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 47%
Triathlon Australia has been rated as progressing for both Olympic and Paralympic disciplines. Triathlon Australia did not have a successful 2014 season; it did not reach its benchmark event targets at the ITU World Triathlon in Edmonton or at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. The sport recognises that while the male athletes improved, more is expected from them and that the female cohort slipped from the high levels expected of them. There were, however, some encouraging under-23 and under-20 medal performances at the world championships.

Triathlon Australia will consider its high performance coaching area and explore how to guarantee future athlete performances at the benchmark events. There is awareness of the coaches’ delicate balance between achieving strong performances across the entire ITU World Triathlon Series and the one-off benchmark event competition.

In 2014 Triathlon Australia implemented a coaching system below the elite level, which aims to provide a greater influence capability at that level and in coaching in the future.

Australia has a rich history of elite performance since the inclusion of triathlon at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, but the competitive environment has become much stronger. Other nations are now concentrating on the sport and this requires intelligence gathering from these countries to glean world’s best practice examples in athlete preparation and coaching.

para-triathlon
The ITU and International Paralympic Committee (IPC) recently confirmed the classes for inclusion at  Rio 2016, which do not reflect the talent base in Australia. The AIS and Triathlon Australia reviewed and agreed to change the Rio targets as the depth of high performance talent able to try for Rio has been negatively affected.

The injury of four-time world champion Bill Chaffey a week before Edmonton affected the expected medal outcome at the event.

While there is strong leadership in the para-triathlon program, the new Rio classes and limited experience of coaches in the majority of the para areas are threats to performance outcomes. The program is working to alleviate these where possible.

governance
Triathlon Australia made a strategic move to begin work on governance from an alignment, culture and behaviour perspective. This has proven to be a valuable and highly effective approach given the strong alignment that now exists between the national and state organisations. It demonstrates the significance of culture and behaviour in the governance equation.

Triathlon is now well placed to address the structural elements as reflected in the mandatory governance principles in the next 12 months. The ASC believes this two-pronged approach will have maximum benefit for the sport.

2014 benchmark event // ITU world series final

Medal target: 1 to 2

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

2013 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2 to 3

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Volleyball

Total investment 2014–15: $2,764,000 (high performance: $2,460,000; participation: $64,000; other: $240,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 42%

indoor volleyball (men)

Volleyball Australia has been rated as progressing for both Olympic and Paralympic disciplines. The Australian team benefited from competition exposure in the FIVB Volleyball Word League in 2014. They played in the finals and qualified for the first division in 2015 — a first for Australia — and achieved their best ever finish at the world championships by finishing equal 15th (though missing their Volleyball Australia benchmark event target of 4–8th). While this performance is to be applauded relative to the team’s past record, Volleyball Australia’s target of a medal in Rio appears ambitious.

There has been significant leadership change in the sport, with a new CEO (April 2014) and high performance director (November 2014) providing a positive direction for the high performance program. The high performance director will oversee both the men’s indoor and beach volleyball sections.

Volleyball Australia will streamline the men’s indoor program. This is necessary given the large number of overseas contracted players and allow for concentration on the senior squad returning for team preparation from May to September, when they will play in the world league’s top division and in the Olympic qualifying competitions (Asian Championships and world cup).

In early 2015 Volleyball Australia commenced a recruitment process for a men’s indoor volleyball coach.

beach volleyball

Beach volleyball achieved its benchmark event targets for 2014 through the efforts of a men’s and women’s pair. This combined set of performances suggests Olympic qualification is a possibility for both male and female pairs, but a medal will require much work to achieve consistently high performances. Volleyball Australia also won the 2014 world under-23 women’s championships and Asian men’s and women’s senior titles.

Through new leadership, Volleyball Australia aims to provide greater direction and targeted resourcing going into the 2015 Olympic qualifying period — a labour-intensive period that will involve a lot of international travel.

governance
Volleyball Australia became a company limited by guarantee in 2014 and is proactively working towards compliance with the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles. Volleyball Australia has not conducted a board evaluation in the last 12 months and would benefit from this independent analysis. Additionally, Volleyball Australia needs to adopt appropriate systems and processes to ensure it continues to identify and attract skilled individuals through a skills audit and nominations process to become directors.

2014 benchmark event // indoor - world championships (men)

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: N

2014 benchmark event // beach - world tour

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

Water Polo

Total investment 2014–15: $3,571,000 (high performance: $3,385,000; participation: $61,000; other: $125,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 68%
Water Polo Australia has been rated as on track. Water Polo Australia achieved targeted results for both the men’s and women’s programs in 2014, indicating it is on track for Rio 2016 targets. Planning is well- underway for Rio and the engagement with the wider Water Polo Australia system was evident in the two-day workshop held at the AIS in the latter part of 2014.

The national coaches for both programs continue to develop the culture, athletes and support teams within their respective programs.

governance
Water Polo Australia is progressing with its governance and has made the required constitutional changes in accordance with the ASC’s mandatory sports governance principles. Once these changes have been adopted, Water Polo Australia needs to continue to progress with its governance improvement, including implementing a board evaluation process in 2015.
 

2014 benchmark event // world cup (men)

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Y

2014 benchmark event // world cup (women)

Medal target: 0 to 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

Weightlifting

Total investment 2014–15: 384,000 (high performance: $362,600; participation: $21,400) 

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 38%
Weightlifting Australia has been rated as progressing. Weightlifting won three medals at the 2014 Commonwealth Games, and had it not been for a controversial jury decision one of the medals could have been gold.

A decision was recently made during the Australian Weightlifting Federation’s strategic planning process that the sport needs to better manage and monitor all elite and pre-elite athletes’ daily training environments — as well as broader high performance elements — and that this should be reflected in each athlete’s individual performance plan. As such, the Australian Weightlifting Federation employed Jacquie White as its full-time high performance coordinator in February 2015.

governance
When benchmarked against other Australia’s Winning Edge sports, weightlifting has some areas below the benchmark standard. The Australian Weightlifting Federation is proactive in continuing to improve governance in areas that are appropriate for the size and capability of the organisation.

2014 benchmark event // Commonwealth Games

Medal target: 1 to 3

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 2 total 3

Wheelchair tennis

Total investment 2014–15: $1,472,250 (high performance – para: $261,250; participation: $966,000; other: $245,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 1%
Wheelchair Tennis has been rated as on track. Wheelchair Tennis made good progress in 2014 achieving its performance expectations, with Dylan Alcott ranked world number two at the end of the year.

The structure of the high performance program has matured in recent years and is now well integrated into Tennis Australia’s national strategy, with a good athlete pathway, good athlete monitoring and well developed support systems.

The program also makes effective use of research and innovation opportunities such as the Australian Paralympic Committee’s seating project, for which Wheelchair Tennis was the pilot sport.

governance
Under the governance structures of Tennis Australia a broad range of programs, such as Wheelchair Tennis, are delivered. The ASC is currently working with Tennis Australia on further strengthening what is already a sound governance base; Tennis Australia’s members will vote in mid-April to accept     these changes. Upon implementation of this further improvement, Tennis Australia will be considered a benchmark for NSO governance.

2014 benchmark event // world rankings

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

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