AIS banner

The tally

The Sports Tally provides an annual health check on sports that receive Australia’s Winning Edge funding. This information has been derived from the Annual Sports Performance Review (ASPR) process. Each sport’s high performance progress has been given an overall rating and commentary has been included for high performance and governance. In addition, each sport’s performance has been highlighted through the 2015 benchmark event target and actual results.

The overall high performance rating considers each sport against its annual benchmark event performance, future potential and health of the sport’s high performance system. The sport-specific information and evidence is provided and reviewed in collaboration with national sporting organisations and the National Institute Network (NIN) through the:

>  high performance planning and reporting template
>  2015 benchmark event reports
>  2015 ASPR
>  2015 performance summary report.

The tally key


underperforming significantly below expectation; solutions to challenges not identified

underperforming

progressing evidence of improvement; solutions to challenges being implemented

progresssing

on track working well across key areas; solutions to other areas well advanced in their resolution or management

on track

performing performing well in all areas; able to effectively manage new challenges and optimise performance outcomes

performing

excelling exceptional performance; seeking innovative solutions to further improve performance outcomes; setting a standard for others to aspire to

excelling
 
Arrow up = up Arrow down = down Equal state = same

 

 

Comparison ranking — each sport will have a comparison ranking compared to the previous year (2014). This will provide an honest assessment of how each sport has performed over the year in comparison to the previous year.

Investment - the total ASC investment and the ASC funding as a percentage of total income has been outlined for each sport. The percentage is calculated as total national sporting organisation (NSO) reported ASC funding, divided by the NSO’s total reported revenue for their most recent financial year as at 30 June 2015.

Where the ASC supports a specific high performance program (e.g. wheelchair tennis) but provides the NSO with funding for broader projects, the investment amount reflects funding to the NSO as a whole. 

Non-medal target - in all cases where no medal has been forecast or where the lower end of a medal range is zero, a non-medal target is agreed. For example, a non-medal target could be a fourth place or a quarter-final.

Y = yes   N = no

Performance target — the tally provides each sport’s benchmark event performance target for 2016, as agreed with the AIS.

Short forms – some of the additional acronyms used in this document:

Mandatory Sports Governance Principles (MSGP)

Athlete Management System (AMS) 

 

The sports

Archery

Total investment 2015–16: $680,800 (high performance: $600,800; participation: $80,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 49%

Archery’s high performance program is rated as on track, having improved from progressing in 2014. The men’s team qualified for the 2016 Olympic Games following a quarter-final performance at the 2015 world championships. Scores of key athletes have been trending positively in domestic and international competition environments.

The sport’s high performance manager and head coach, with the performance support team at the Queensland Academy of Sport (QAS) and AIS, have worked on quality control with the current squad and on strategies to help archery deliver sustainable elite performances.

A new ‘Archery Diary’ and the implementation of the Athlete Management System (AMS) enhance the quality of data available to track athletes’ performance, identify talent and inform future decisions. A key deliverable for Archery Australia is the introduction of development programs to improve connections between elite and club programs, and supplement the coach support provided by the head coach.

Governance

When benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports, Archery Australia has some areas below the standard. Archery has developed a fully integrated national membership database and is working towards meeting the ASC’s Mandatory Sports Governance Principles (MSGP).

2015 benchmark event // world championships

medal target: -

non-medal target: N

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

medal target: 0-1

non-medal target: place 4th-8th (x1-2)

Athletics

Total investment 2015–16: $8,678,900 (high performance: $6,520,000; high performance - para: $1,630,000; participation: $446,400; other: $82,500)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 73%

The Athletics Australia high performance program is rated as progressing, while the para-athletics program is rated on track. The ongoing implementation of the Athletics Australia reviews (both independent and board-led) has seen consolidation of overall governance reforms and the appointment of a number of key leadership positions that have started to have an impact in the high performance area of the sport.

Results in able-body competitions were at the lower end of targets with several athletes affected by injury and illness. In the past 12 months, the para program specifi cally targeted the conversion of minor medals at the 2013 IPC Athletics Championships in Lyon to gold medals at the corresponding 2015 event in Doha. These efforts paid dividends with strong performances from a higher number of athletes.

A new head coach and performance services manager and the creation of athlete performance advisor roles have provided a focal point for service delivery, daily training environment access and coaching contact. Through these appointments, a review of the performance support mix, coach development and athlete transition from junior to senior ranks is underway. These initiatives will allow Athletics Australia to develop and implement strategies to improve the accountability, monitoring and coordination of support to athletes.

With a focused target of minimising the effect of injury and illness on performance, athletics is regarded as on track to achieve its Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic targets.

Governance

Athletics Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes in line with the MSGP. The sport has achieved significant progress against recommendations of the Independent Review of Athletics in Australia with the major outcome of an in-depth independent board and committee review. Athletics Australia has also implemented a risk management framework across the board and senior management. The organisation will re-draft elements of its constitution, with a focus on addressing gaps such as conflict of interests for directors.

2015 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2-4

Actual: gold 0 silver 2 bronze 0 total 2

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 23-28

Actual: gold 7 silver 3 bronze 10 total 20

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 2-4

2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 20-25

Australian Paralympic Committee managed sport

Total investment 2015-16: $3,588,921– this includes $2,520,522 for APC operations, $300,000 for participation, $730,000 for Paralympic sports managed by the APC and $38,399 in other funding.

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 54%

As well as overseeing the preparation of the Australian team for the Paralympic Games and delivery of cross-sector programs, the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC) directly manages three Australia’s Winning Edge high performance programs:

Boccia — Boccia’s high performance program is rated as progressing. The sport’s high performance program reduced its activities in 2015 to manage a tighter budget. While boccia has only a narrow prospect of contributing to the 2016 Rio Paralympic medal targets, there is a development strategy in place for 2020.

Goalball — Goalball’s high performance program is rated as underperforming. The Australian women’s goalball team won bronze at the 2015 Asia/Pacific Championships and finished fourth at the IBSA World Games. The sport’s results in 2015 indicate it is unlikely to contribute to Australia’s medal targets in 2016. Considerable work is required on underpinning structures to ensure the sport can achieve high performance outcomes at future Games.

Wheelchair Rugby — Wheelchair Rugby’s high performance program is rated as on track. The team qualified for the Paralympics in 2014 when it won the world championships and it also finished second in the Asia/Ocenania qualifiers in Japan. While there are some concerns about gaps that have emerged in the program’s ability to fully support its Paralympic preparations within the current budget allocation, the exposure of athletes to international competition has created a cohort of athletes capable of winning gold in Rio.

Governance

The APC is progressing with its governance reform and has been making changes in line with the MSGP. Significant board renewal occurred in 2015 and the board now boasts directors from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. The development of an updated strategic plan is on track, and director elections in 2016 should further reflect the skills and expertise required to drive the APC’s strategic direction forward.

Boccia — 2015 Paralympic benchmark event // international events

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

Goalball — 2015 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Qualification Tournament

Medal target: 0-1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

Wheelchair rugby — 2014 Paralympic benchmark event // Wheelchair Rugby World Challenge

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

Performance target

Boccia — 2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th (x5)

Goalball — 2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 0-1

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th (x1)

Wheelchair rugby — 2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 1

Badminton

Total investment 2015-16: $660,000 (high performance: $460,000; participation $200,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 22% 


The Badminton Australia high performance program is rated as progressing. The program is building momentum following significant changes in early 2015 to its high performance leadership and coaching structure, which utilises consultant coaches and delivers to a targeted group of emerging athletes.

Results at the badminton world championships saw positive performances from emerging level athletes; however other athletes at this event were hindered by illness. As such, performances are expected to improve at future events. Badminton Australia has delivered on many critical actions and objectives through the year, looking to progress the program at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games and beyond to the Commonwealth Games. Its Melbourne-based daily performance facilities provide an ideal training environment and performance support services for its targeted group of emerging athletes.

The program is developing critical competition and training experience by participating in a number of specific international training camps and competitions, which integrate with world-class athletes and consultant coaches.

Governance

When benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports, Badminton Australia has some areas below the standard. The strategic and participation plans have been developed in conjunction with all states which demonstrates alignment to a single national entity for all forms of the sport. Badminton Australia is working through constitutional reform, which will improve its ability to deliver national programs and products. Overall the sport has made some steps towards adopting good governance standards.

2015 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target:

Non-medal target achieved: N

Performance Target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Non-medal target: two pairs place 9th to 16th

Basketball

Total investment 2015-16: $6,820,000 (high performance: $4,780,000; high performance – para $1,075,000; participation $910,000; other $55,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 66%

 

Basketball Australia is rated as progressing for both Olympic and Paralympic programs. The sport’s high performance programs are led by quality coaches who continue to progress their plans for Olympic and Paralympic success. With the appointment of a general manager of high performance in November and the recommendations from the high performance realignment work underway it is envisaged there will be greater leadership and alignment of the Basketball Australia high performance system in the future.

The men’s team (Boomers) and women’s team (Opals) qualified for the Rio Olympics at the Oceania qualifiers in Melbourne in August in front of a sold-out 15,000 strong crowd. The men’s Paralympic team (Rollers) won the Asia/Oceania qualifiers in Japan in October to secure their place at the Paralympics.

The women’s Paralympic team (Gliders) however missed qualification for Rio after taking the silver medal behind China at the women’s event.

Governance

Basketball Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes in line with the MSGP. Basketball has established a strong nominations committee with an independent chair, along with a skills matrix to assess the board’s needs. Despite the strong skills-gap analysis process, member associations did not elect the nominations committee’s recommended candidates to the board at the 2015 annual general meeting. This has undermined the nominations committee’s role and its processes. This outcome was broadly representative of basketball’s governance: despite having appropriate structures and systems, cultural issues and misalignment in the sport are limiting its ability to progress.

2015 benchmark event // Oceania Regional Championships (men)

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

2015 benchmark event - // Oceania Regional Championship (women)

Medal target:1

Actual: gold1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

2015 Paralympic benchmark event - // Asia/Oceania Zone Qualifying Tournament (men)

Medal target:1

Actual: gold1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

2015 Paralympic benchmark event - // Asia/Oceania Zone Qualifying Tournament (women)

Medal target:1

Actual: gold0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games(men)

Medal target: place 4th to 8th

2016 benchmark event - // Olympic Games (women) (women)

Medal target:1

2016 Paralympic benchmark event - // Paralympic Games (men)

Medal target:1

2016 Paralympic benchmark event - // Paralympic Games (women)

Medal target:1*

*Did not qualify

Bowls

Total investment 2015-16: $1,297,700 (high performance: $667,200; participation $625,000 and other $5,500)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 19% 

The Bowls Australia high performance program is rated as performing.

Results at the Asia Pacific Championships were outstanding with the Jackaroos wining four gold medals, two silver and two bronze from eight events. This result reflects Bowls Australia’s determination to implement key findings and recommendations from its 2014 high performance review. The review recommendations have led to significant progress, reflected in the sport-specific performance indicators and critical actions.

The next major tournaments, the 2016 world championships and the 2018 Commonwealth Games, are being played in the southern hemisphere on faster-paced greens more suitable to Australian bowlers. There is still a major concern with Australian bowlers adapting to the slower-paced greens of the northern hemisphere, however with increased PhD research Bowls Australia believes their athletes will be better prepared for slow greens in the future.

The program continues to develop its high performance culture and expectations on national squad athletes in their daily training environment. The introduction of the AMS and the compliance of athletes to adhere to submitting records has been well received, placing more accountability on the athlete. The program continues to produce athletes at the highest level and further clarification of the roles within the high performance program will enhance ability to achieve future benchmark event targets.

Governance

Bowls Australia has continued to work towards adopting the MSGP and performs well when benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports. Bowls Australia has been utilising the ASC’s board education and evaluation tool with state bodies and will be reviewing the governance structure within bowls. It has established a steering committee from its 2015 members forum to drive this work.

2015 benchmark event - // Asia Pacific Championships

Medal target: 5-7

Actual: gold4 silver 2 bronze 2 total 8

Performance target

2016 benchmark event - // world championships

Medal target: 4-7

Boxing

Total investment 2015-16: $904,000 (high performance: $850,000; participation $54,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 84% 

Boxing’s high performance program is rated as progressing. Competition results for key female athletes were strong in 2015 however performances at the 2015 men’s world championships were below target.

In 2015 there has been further engagement of the Boxing Australia national coaches who largely operate in decentralised training environments, to successfully integrate them with AIS training camps. The utilisation of the AIS and continued exposure to international training partners has enhanced the daily performance environment for some key athletes. The quality control of categorised athletes in decentralised environments remains a challenge. Boxing Australia is implementing strategies to address this issue including the introduction of the National Talent Identification and Development Coach Network.

Governance

Boxing Australia has continued to work towards adopting the MSGP and performs well in most areas when benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports. The organisation is performing well on its integrity measures and has committed to being a leader in the field across all metrics. A key priority for Boxing Australia over the next 12 months will be the implementation of annual board evaluations with external insights as part of their ongoing commitment to good governance.

2015 benchmark event // world championships (men)

Medal target: 0-1

Actual: gold0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target: N

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th (x1)

Canoeing

Total investment 2015-16: $5,153,000 (high performance: $4,700,000; high performance – para $225,000; participation $175,000; other $53,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 71%


Australian Canoeing has been rated as progressing for its Olympic program and on track for its Paralympic program. It did not achieve its 2015 benchmark event targets in sprint or slalom disciplines, but there are encouraging signs within the men’s sprint 1000 kayak program and Jessica Fox in the K1 slalom event that the sport can achieve its Olympic goals in Rio.

Jessica Fox lost her 2014 K1 Championship title, finishing fourth (equivalent 3rd nation in Olympic ranking), but retained her C1 title, one of few canoe/kayak athletes in history to have won three world titles.

Australian Canoeing also won a medal in the non-Olympic women’s C1 team race and has earned two slalom quota spots so far for Rio.

In sprint canoe, Australia won silver in the K2 1000, and the men’s K4 1000 crew can also contribute to Rio goals. The 2015 crew included a mix of young and experienced talent. The men’s 1000m program has qualified seven quota spots for Rio, more than any other nation. In non-Olympic events, Australia won gold in the K2 500 and the K1 5000 title.

More sprint and slalom quota spots can be achieved through the 2016 Oceania Qualifying competition.

Para-canoe – The para-canoe program exceeded its benchmark targets in 2015. Quickly adjusting to late classification changes for Rio, the team adapted to win gold, silver and bronze medals in Milan in the new Paralympic events. Australian Canoeing will focus on flexibility of daily training environment service delivery, talent identification, coach development and performance management.

Governance

Australian Canoeing is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes in line with the MSGP. Reforms include a move to a Company Limited by Guarantee and adopting several constitutional changes bringing the sport in line with the mandatory principles. The sport still needs to build on its whole-of-sport strategy for the next three years and undertake a board performance review in 2016–17 to complement previous work.

2015 benchmark event // world championships (combined)

Medal target: 2-4

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 0 total 1

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 0-2

Actual: gold1 silver 1 bronze 1 total 3

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 2-4

2016 benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 0-2

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th (x1-2)

Cricket (women's)

Total investment (Cricket Australia) 2015-16: $1,320,800 (high performance: $200,000; participation $1,116,000; $4,800)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: Less than 1% 

Cricket Australia’s high performance women’s program is rated as performing. The Southern Stars achieved their goal of becoming the top-ranked team in the three forms of women’s cricket. They won the Ashes Series against England, are the current T20 World Cup champions and one-day international world champions.

The team’s continued success at major tournaments, particularly in tight situations, is a testament to the group’s improved culture and leadership. Captain Meg Lanning is the No. 1 ranked player in International Cricket Council rankings in both one-day international and Twenty20 forms of the game.

Cricket Australia’s greater investment in underpinning state-level programs is showing results with young quality athletes coming through the athlete pathway and increased numbers across junior programs.

There are still concerns around batters’ ability to play against quality spin bowling however specific camps at the centre of excellence and in Sri Lanka are improving this skillset. The team’s average age of 24 augurs well for the next four to six years as the younger players in the squad gain further experience.

Governance

When benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports, Cricket Australia is performing well against the MSGP. Cricket Australia is achieving best practice in sports science sports medicine principles and has, in recent years, implemented a number of positive changes to its governance. To continue this governance improvement the sport should consider areas such as board diversity.

2015 benchmark event // Women's Ashes Series

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Women's Twenty20 World Cup

Medal target: 1

Cycling

Total investment 2015-16 (including BMX): $9,868,080 (high performance: $7,830,000; high performance – para $1,120,000; participation $645,000; other $273,080)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 51% 

Cycling Australia’s high performance program is rated on track for both Olympic and Paralympic disciplines. Results at the 2015 World Track Championships were particularly encouraging with Australia on top of the overall medal tally with 11 medals (four gold, four silver and three bronze). Six of these medals were in Olympic events. For the second year in a row, Australia secured a silver medal in the World Championships Men’s Road Race.

The BMX program continued its history of success at world championships securing a silver medal in extremely challenging conditions. The para-cycling squad also had some encouraging performances in both road and track disciplines securing five gold medals in Olympic discipline events.

Cycling Australia’s high performance unit continues to operate an effective track program out of Adelaide. Adelaide Superdrome renovations have enhanced interaction among coaching and performance support staff, and improved training facilities for athletes. Coaching and performance staff are continually seeking performance gains through innovative programs and research projects that can help deliver future success.

The large scope of the sport, Cycling Australia’s own financial challenges and a reliance on commercial sponsorships are being effectively managed but remain risk factors for the high performance program beyond 2016.

Governance

Cycling Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes in line with the MSGP. The organisation has established a new nominations committee which uses an appropriate skills matrix to identify board needs. This has led to two new appointed directors joining the Cycling Australia board. The sport plans to roll out its strategic plan through 2016.

2015 benchmark event // world championships (combined)

Medal target: 5-8

Actual: gold3 silver 3 bronze 2 total 8

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships (combined)

Medal target: 12-17

Actual: gold 6 silver 8 bronze 6 total 20

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 5-7

2016 benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 9-11

Diving

Total investment 2015-16: $2,188,000 (high performance: $2,115,000; participation $50,000; other $23,000) 

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 82% 

Diving Australia has been rated on track to achieving its Rio Olympic goal.

It had a successful 2015 international season qualifying athletes for half the quota spots for the Rio Games. It won two medals (one non-Olympic) at the world championships as well as fourth in the women’s 3m, fifth in the women’s 10m, fourth in mixed 3m synchro and fifth in the women’s 1m.

Feedback from Diving Australia, state institutes and academies for sport (SIS/SAS) partners and AIS colleagues suggests that the three-centre model, linked to its national coaching panel and performance centre appears to be raising the standard across the network. Work is needed to better align efforts behind the Diving Australia Synchro Plan initiative.

The organisation needs to continue refining its restructured leadership model, with additional planning, alignment and appraisals before the Olympic Games, and reassessment post Rio.

Diving Australia has increased communication across its stakeholder group and will seek greater alignment of its elite pathway program and on-site leadership via the national coach.

Governance

Diving Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes in line with the MSGP. The organisation has addressed key areas involving board composition and operation in line with these principles, which will be further assisted by the finalisation of its audit and risk committee.

2015 benchmark event // FINA World Championships

Medal target: 1-2

Actual: gold0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 1-2

Equestrian

Total investment 2015-16: $3,095,000 (high performance: $2,140,000; high performance – para $500,000; participation $420,000; other $35,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 50% 

Both the equestrian and para-equestrian programs are rated as on track. Significant performance shifts have been made across both programs following reviews conducted after the 2014 World Equestrian Games. This has resulted in better management of both human and equine athletes and a greater commitment to high performance processes from all involved parties.

The eventing team participated in the 2015 Nations Cup and finished in third place overall. Athletes compete at various events throughout the year; the majority of these are overseas. A greater emphasis on performance analysis and direct coach-athlete feedback has been very positive.

In para-equestrian there has been a significant improvement in the athletes’ daily training environment over the past 12 months. Performance impacts will be assessed from the competition season which runs from October to January.

Governance

Equestrian Australia had some governance challenges in 2015 and is continuing to work towards adopting the MSGP. The establishment of a nominations committee and the completion of a skills audit of the board were both significant achievements to help progress the sport’s governance. Equestrian Australia requires constitutional change to become compliant with the MSGP and would benefit from a board evaluation.

2015 benchmark event // combined results from three-star and four-star events*

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

* there were no world championship events in 2015. Result counted was the performance of the eventing team at the 2015 Nations Cup where the team placed third

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // CPEDI three-star Boneo Park

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold0 silver 0 bronze 2 total 2

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 1-2

2016 benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 1-3

Football (Soccer - Matildas)

Total investment 2015-16 (Football Federation Australia): $2,910,000 (high performance: $1,950,000; participation $950,000; other $10,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 3% 

Football Federation Australia’s (FFA’s) women’s high performance program is rated as on track. The Matildas program continues to make significant progress under head coach Alen Stajcic. The top-eight, quarter-final finish at the FIFA Women’s World Cup in 2015 indicates the squad is on track for the Rio Olympic Games. The team qualified for the Olympics in March 2016 at the Asia Cup.

The national program has had an increased focus on greater integration and buy-in within the Women’s National League coaches and programs. This focus has included an agreement that aligned national squad objectives, a five-month full-time camps program to prepare for the World Cup and prioritising a competitive international competition program to increase experience against world-class opposition. Concerns remain around the daily training environment of national and development squad athletes with no SIS/SAS programs underpinning the national program. Athletes are experiencing difficulties finding quality daily training environments through the local club network.

Governance

FFA continued to progress in line with the MSGP in 2015, including evidence of a sound process of consultation with member bodies to develop its comprehensive Whole of Football Plan. The key priority for FFA is to engage in an annual board evaluation process and appoint an external, independent CA or CPA to its audit and risk committee.

2015 benchmark event // FIFA Women's World Cup

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Y

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games (women)

Medal target: 0-1

Non-medal target achieved: semi-final (top 4)

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games (men)

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th*

  *Did not qualify

Golf

Total investment 2015-16: $1,625,000 (high performance: $1,010,000; participation $615,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 12% 

Golf Australia’s high performance program is rated as performing, with its Australia’s Winning Edge athletes continuing to have a major presence on the USPGA and LPGA Tour.

Jason Day had an outstanding year, finishing as the world’s No. 2 ranked player after five tournament victories, including his first Major — The USPGA Championship. He has had 12 top-10 finishes.

Adam Scott had a poor year by his standards with only three top-10 finishes. Marc Leishman had a breakout year with four top-10 finishes including tied second in the British Open after playing in a three-way play-off to decide the winner. Golf Australia Rookie Squad member Cameron Smith finished fourth at the US Open and gained full status on the PGA Tour for 2016. Australia has three golfers in the PGA top 50 and seven in the top 100.

Golf Australia’s Rookie Squad member Minjee Lee continues to climb the world rankings and has overtaken Karrie Webb as Australia’s highest-ranked golfer at 13th on the LPGA. Minjee Lee won her first Tour victory, the Kingsmill Championship, in May as well as having five top-10 finishes. Karrie Webb continues to be competitive on the LPGA circuit and is eager to compete at Rio.

Golf Australia’s high performance director continues to excel in managing a complicated program involving the difficult logistics of athletes on tour.

Governance

Golf Australia is performing well in adopting the MSGP. The organisation has made significant progress toward ensuring all parts of the federated structure are working in cohesion and toward a single direction for the sport. Golf Australia is actively pursuing a one management model and this work is positioning golf as a benchmark for national alignment. Golf Australia should continue developing its integrity policies and procedures.

2015 benchmark event // major championship (combined)

Medal target: 1-2

Actual: gold 1 silver 1 bronze 0 total 2

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 0-2

Gymnastics

Total investment 2015-16: $3,198,971 (high performance: $2,372,971; participation $816,000; other $10,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 41% 

Gymnastics Australia is rated as underperforming. The sport has re-established a residential men’s program as a centre of excellence in Canberra, and a women’s centre of excellence in Melbourne and Perth. The benefits of this change have already been apparent in the men’s program, which has seen significant improvement in the quality of the daily performance environment, and consequently the quality of its athletes’ performance. The associated concentration of resources has allowed for greater investment in performance support at all three centres, better collaboration between national and state-based high performance staff, and improved accountability.

While these changes have been significant, it will take some time to show significant results. Performances for both men’s and women’s artistic gymnastics at the 2015 world championships were well below expectations, and reflect a consistent decline in Australia’s competitiveness in artistic gymnastics over recent years. The women’s artistic team finished 14th, and has since failed to qualify for Rio at the Olympic Test Event. Both men’s artistic and trampoline have qualified one individual all around gymnast to contest the Rio Test Event. Rhythmic gymnastics has qualified one gymnast for the Rio Games.

For the longer term, Gymnastics Australia needs to review its current national model for high performance gymnastics, and implement a significant rebuilding program that can deliver Olympic success.

Governance

Gymnastics Australia is performing well in adopting the MSGP. The organisation is making good progress on a number of fronts including reporting processes, strategy and alignment throughout the sport. To continue its adoption of the mandatory standards the organisation must address the principle of not appointing or electing a former chief executive onto the board.

2015 benchmark event // world championships (combined)

Medal target: 1-2

Actual: gold0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 0-1

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th (x3-5)
place 9th-16th (x2-3)

Hockey

Total investment 2015-16: $6,576,800 (high performance: $5,840,000; participation $661,800; other $75,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 66% 

Hockey Australia’s high performance program is rated as on track for the women’s program and performing for the men’s program. The centralised training environment in Perth is considered world’s best and gives men’s and women’s squads a considerable competitive advantage. Players receive specialist skill development in goalkeeping, drag flicking, penalty corner attack and defence. The sport has a strong SIS/ SAS network and believes a stronger alignment to the national program is paramount to continued success.

Transition within the men’s high performance program has been extensive over the past 12 months with several new appointments including head coach, high performance director and national assistant coaches. Having qualified for the Rio Olympic Games at the WSL semi-finals, further athlete development is possible at the Oceania and WSL finals competitions. A focus on building squad depth may lead to inconsistent performances during this phase but should expose younger talent to a greater competitive training environment in the lead-up to the Olympics.

The women’s high performance program continues to build on the progress made after a successful 2014. A settled, experienced coaching group is making significant contributions to the program with athletes challenged to create self-driven development environments. With Rio Olympic qualification achieved at the WSL semi-finals, younger squad members will be able to gain more experience and put further pressure on the more experienced athletes in the squad. Results were a little inconsistent in 2015 compared to 2014 but this can be attributed to exploring playing styles and trialling younger athletes.

Challenges for the national program include creating quality international competition opportunities, especially against the top European teams including Netherlands, Germany and England which are essential for Rio preparations.

Hockey Australia engaged extensively with partners and stakeholders during August and September, including a face-to-face high-performance forum. Key forum outcomes will form the basis for the next level of engagement and post-Rio planning. Other discussions covered the continuation of the centralised senior training environment, creating a more-aligned national network and pathway post-Rio and ensuring the Australian Hockey League plays a greater role as the ‘flagship’ competition of Hockey Australia.

Governance

Hockey Australia continued to actively pursue governance reform in 2015 and performed in line with most of the MSGP. The sport has completed a board evaluation, implemented a successful nominations committee process, and conducted a board skills matrix. Hockey Australia is still failing to meet MSGP regarding the disclosure of executive salaries and associated expenses.

2015 benchmark event // world league semi-finals round 3 (men)

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

2015 benchmark event // world league semi-finals round 3 (women)

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games (men)

Medal target: 1

 

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games (women)

Medal target: 0-1

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th

 

Judo

Total investment 2015-16: $717,800 (high performance: $667,800; participation $50,000) 

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 63%

Judo’s high performance program is rated as progressing, having improved from underperforming in 2014. Judo had a disappointing 2015 world championships, with results being below target. Despite this the Judo Federation of Australia is expected to qualify 6–8 athletes for the 2016 Olympic Games by gaining world ranking points from other international competitions.

The sport has implemented individual performance plans for all categorised athletes, but the number of categorised athletes must be rationalised to better prioritise resources. A new CEO is now in place along with the recruitment of part-time high performance leadership and coaching support through to the 2016 Olympic Games. The organisation needs to review its broader national coaching structure to establish how these and other coaches fit more broadly in the national network.

Governance

The Judo Federation of Australia continues to progress the organisation’s governance reform by implementing recommendations outlined in the 2014 governance review. A new strategic plan has been developed and the national board of directors and CEO are working with member states to ensure strategies are aligned.

When benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports, The Judo Federation of Australia still has some areas to progress. The transition to a Company Limited by Guarantee and establishment of nominations and audit and risk committees — with clear terms of reference — are critical priorities for the sport’s sustained success.

2015 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved:N

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 0-1

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th (x1)

Netball

Total investment 2015-16: $3,079,900 (high performance: $2,065,000; participation $979,900; other $35,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 18% 

Netball is rated as excelling for high performance following a highly successful four-year cycle culminating in the Diamonds winning the 2015 World Cup and cementing its status as the number one team in the world. This followed winning the 2014 Commonwealth Games gold medal. Attention to detail across all aspects of high performance is the reason behind Netball Australia’s success over the past two years.

Management of the Diamonds athletes was instrumental to the team’s success at the World Cup in Sydney. The coaches and staff who work with the Diamonds are world class and committed to providing athletes with the best environment to enable success.

The national high performance program continues to ensure the development of the system with dissemination of information and continual review of pathways and development opportunities for athletes and staff. Netball Australia is continually looking for ways to improve and provide leadership for the sport as it continues to grow.

Governance

Netball Australia demonstrates industry-best practice for governance in many areas, setting the benchmark in adopting the MSGP. Netball Australia is operating on a continuous improvement model for several implemented and established governance practices. This includes the operations of the nominations committee and audit committee, board performance evaluation, and annual reporting. The sport will continue to work on improving governance by undertaking constitutional review which will include removing the duplication of the roles of chair and president.

2015 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Constellation Cup

Medal target: 1

Olympic Winter Institute of Australia

Total investment 2015-16: $2,638,645 (high performance: $2,573,645; other $65,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 64%

The Olympic Winter Institute of Australia is rated as on track. The Institute’s snow sport athletes exceeded their performance targets at the 2015 world championships. Their four medals, including two golds, indicate that the program is on track to meet its 2018 targets. However, several key athletes suffered significant injuries or illness in 2015, which highlighted the fragility of the Australia’s Winning Edge plans in these high-risk disciplines.

The key fundamentals of high performance programs are all covered in the priority Olympic disciplines. The major performance support requirements are in place for key current cycle athletes through the NIN. However, there is a risk of gaps emerging in the support of future cycle athletes due to resourcing limitations.

The ‘Spin to Win’ talent transfer project has yielded arguably the best and most consistent range of entry-level talent of any freestyle talent identification project. However, funding for this program is uncertain beyond 2016.

The NSW Institute of Sport acrobatic facility at Thredbo is now fully operational and is of significant benefit for a number of the sport programs. The new half pipe and water jump facility projects have experienced delays. Once completed, these facilities will significantly enhance training opportunities for athletes in priority disciplines.

Governance

Given its unique structure, the Olympic Winter Institute of Australia continued to work with the ASC in 2015 to determine how to best apply relevant sections of the MSGP.

2015 benchmark event // world championships (combined)

Medal target: 1-3

Actual: gold2 silver 1 bronze 1 total 4

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // world cup events

Medal target: 1-3

Rowing

Total investment 2015-16: $8,234,400 (high performance: $7,400,000; high performance – para $480,000; participation $239,400; other $115,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 61% 

Rowing Australia is rated as progressing in Olympic programs and performing for Paralympic programs. In Olympic-class boats Rowing Australia achieved its 2015 world championships gold medal target, but the total of three medals was short of its overall medal goal.

Despite missing the overall target in Olympic boats there is evidence that, with five boats claiming top-five places, rowing is positioned to be able to achieve its Rio 2016 Olympic medal targets.

The challenge for 2016 is to convert existing medals to gold and the fifth placings to medals. Rowing Australia is taking steps to improve the benchmark event performances of its Olympic-qualified boats through greater centralisation of the athletes’ domestic preparation.

In para-rowing events Australia finished at the top of the world championships medal table for a third successive year, with gold medals in the men’s single sculls and mixed double sculls Paralympic-class boats. The continued good results highlight the success of Rowing Australia’s post-London restructure of its para program.

Governance

Rowing Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes to meet the MSGP, including an independent board evaluation, the establishment of two key committees to advise the board on high performance and participation, and the continued development of a whole-of-sport strategic plan. The sport is educating staff and officials on integrity matters as well as strengthening the nominations and audit and risk committee’s members and processes.

2015 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target:4-6

Actual: gold1 silver 2 bronze 0 total 3

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1-2

Actual: gold2 silver 0 bronze 0 total 2

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target:3-6

2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target:1-2

Rugby 7s

Total investment (Australian Rugby Union) 2015-16: $1,716,000 (high performance: $1,040,000; participation $666,000; other $10,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 2% 

The Australian Rugby Union women’s and men’s 7s teams have been rated as progressing and on track respectively. Both qualified for the Rio Olympic Games in 2015. The women qualified by ranking third in the World Rugby Series and the men when they won the Oceania Qualifying Competition in Auckland in November.

The women had particularly strong World Rugby Series results including winning the London Sevens tournament and finishing runners-up at the Dubai, Sao Paulo and Netherlands tournaments.

The Narrabeen centralised 7s program has had some structural challenges including the loss of the director of 7s/men’s head coach and the men’s strength and conditioning lead. The ARU subsequently reviewed the combined program’s structure and enhanced its capability to fill the positions in order to provide appropriate service support to both teams. This included significant additional investment by the ARU.

Although the ARU reports an overall deficit of $6.3m for the past period, it has worked to increase internal funding levels to the 7s program.

The ARU is delivering national developmental programs. It has significantly improved access to younger players with the investment in three talent identification and development positions, state and national youth team programs, training sessions in the state, and a series of live-in camps and tournament preparation assemblies. Several new 7s players have emerged through senior and youth national championships.

Governance

Australian Rugby Union is performing well in adopting the MSGP. There has been evidence of a robust engagement process and collaboration with member bodies to develop the 2014–16 strategic plan. Gender balance on the ARU board should be a priority of the board, and nominations committee. Appointing an external, independent CA or CPA to the organisation’s audit and risk committee is also a priority.

2015 benchmark event // IRB series (men)

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Y

2015 benchmark event // IRB series (women)

Medal target:1

Actual: gold0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games (men)

Medal target: 0-1

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th (x1)

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games (women)

Medal target: 1

Sailing

Total investment 2015-16: $9,152,018 (high performance: $7,550,000; high performance – para $705,000; participation $546,400; other $350,618)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 73% 

Yachting Australia is rated as performing across both the Olympic and Paralympic programs, with results in benchmark events indicating both are on track to achieve medal targets in Rio.

Sailing is excelling in its ongoing use of research and technology to ensure its programs are cutting edge across all sports science disciplines. The ongoing commitment of service providers and program staff to providing the best training and competition environments enable athletes to focus on performance outcomes.

The Rio Olympic test event in August was quite successful for the six Olympic classes that competed, with the team winning two gold and a bronze medal with two more top-10 finishes. The Paralympic team had a camp in Rio in October which was also very successful. Ongoing access and exposure to the Rio conditions will be invaluable to both programs leading up to the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic games.

Governance

Yachting Australia is performing well in adopting the MSGP. The sport is closely aligned strategically with its member associations, and is actively pursuing a one management model. This work is positioning it as a benchmark organisation in terms of national alignment. Yachting Australia has not yet achieved complete compliance with disclosure of reporting bands for remuneration and associated expenses for key management personnel.

2015 benchmark event // world championships (combined)

Medal target: 4-5

Actual: gold1 silver 2 bronze 1 total 4

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 2-3

Actual: gold1 silver 1 bronze 1 total 3

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 3-5

2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 1-3

Shooting

Total investment 2015-16: $2,460,000 (high performance: $1,960,000; high performance – para $295,000; participation $170,000; other $35,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 89% 

Shooting Australia’s high performance program is rated as on track, across both Olympic and Paralympic programs.

While overall performances at the 2015 benchmark events were slightly below target, results of future cycle athletes at these events exceeded expectations with a couple of young athletes emerging as 2016 Olympic Games prospects. Shooting Australia also won four Olympic and seven Paralympic quotas on the open market through world cup competition, a great result for shooting.

The establishment of a performance enhancement group and the implementation of a part-time performance support coordinator will help monitor key athletes in the lead-up to the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games and beyond. Data gained from the AMS will assist the performance enhancement group manage and support key athletes, but athletes have been inconsistent in its use since it was launched in July. Shooting Australia is implementing strategies to increase athlete compliance.

Shooting Australia has formalised its athlete pathway framework following a consultative process in early 2015. This framework is due for rollout and implementation in 2016, with Shooting Australia to work with its member bodies to establish an ideal delivery and support model for all stages of the athlete pathway.

Some key challenges that remain in the sport include the decentralised nature of many of the athletes’ daily performance environments, however this is slowly improving. The strong reliance on the current head

coaches has led the organisation to review how it can better supplement this coach support within Australia and provide enhanced centralised training opportunities for all categorised athletes. Enhanced engagement with relevant SIS/SAS will help create a more robust and sustainable high performance program.

Governance

Shooting Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes in line with the MSGP. Of note this year was the appointment of independent directors and a complete policy review. Given the sport’s unique governance structure, a priority is to complete Shooting Australia’s own governance review and work with the member bodies to adopt the recommended changes.

2015 benchmark event // world championships (combined)

Medal target: 0-1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Non-medal target: N

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // IPC world Cup Brisbane

Medal target: 1-2

Actual: gold 0 silver 1 bronze 1 total 2

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 1-2

2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 1-2

Ski and Snowboard

Total investment 2015-16: $1,897,078 (high performance: $767,600; high performance – para $934,478; participation $155,000; other $40,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 33% 

Ski and Snowboard Australia (SSA) is rated as on track in both its Olympic and Paralympic programs.

The Olympic category athletes exceeded their performance targets by winning four medals, including two golds, at the 2015 world championships. These results indicate that the program is on track towards its 2018 Olympic Winter Games targets. However, several key athletes suffered significant injuries or illness in 2015, which highlighted the vulnerability of the Australia’s Winning Edge plans in these high-risk disciplines.

The para winter sport program achieved its medal targets at the 2015 world championships, winning six medals, including three gold. Melissa Perrine and her guide Andrew Bor won five of the six medals. In 2015 the para program moved from its long-term management under the Australian Paralympic Committee to management by SSA. This has had several positive impacts, not least of which is being able to draw on SSA’s many years of industry experience in managing high performance snow sport programs. The para program is also being incorporated into SSA’s athlete pathway system.

The NSW Institute of Sport’s acrobatic facility at Thredbo is now fully operational and of significant benefit to the daily training environments of a number of the freestyle snow sport programs. The ‘Spin to Win’ talent transfer project has yielded arguably the best and most consistent range of entry level talent of any freestyle talent identification project. Funding for this project is uncertain beyond 2016.

Governance

Ski and Snowboard Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes in line with the MSGP. The sport has improved in several areas: completing a board skills matrix which is reviewed annually, developing a three-year rolling strategic plan, and a fully costed operating budget. Ski and Snowboard Australia should address maximum terms for directors and undertake an external board evaluation process. The sport has identified the need to engage an independent external CPA or CA to their audit and risk committee.

2015 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1-3

Actual: gold 2 silver 1 bronze 1 total 4

2015 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1-6

Actual: gold 3 silver 2 bronze 1 total 6

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // various world cup events

Medal target: 1-3

2016 Paralympic benchmark event // various world cup events

Medal target: 1-3

 

Squash

Total investment 2015-16: $806,400 (high performance: $530,000; participation $268,400; other $8,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 59% 

Squash Australia’s high performance program is been rated as progressing. Unfortunately the sport’s benchmark event for 2015, the World Teams Event Championship, was cancelled due to security concerns in Cairo.

Squash Australia conducted an AIS-facilitated high performance review in August and is acting on key findings and recommendations. The organisation has experienced a number of staff changes with a new CEO commencing in July. The high performance program has suffered from not having a high performance manager/head coach in place for a 12–18 month period but appointments for a performance manager and performance coach are planned to be made in early 2016.

Governance

Squash Australia continues to work towards adopting the MSGP and performs well in most areas when benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports. At its October 2015 annual general meeting, the organisation amended its constitution to include director term limits and maximum limits in line with the MSGP. Squash Australia is actively working towards becoming fully compliant with the MSGP.

2015 benchmark event // world senior men’s championships

*event cancelled

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // world senior women’s team championship

Medal target: 0-1

Non-medal target: place 4th-8th (x1)

Surf life saving

Total investment 2015-16: $862,000 (high performance: $200,000; participation $662,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 4%  

Surf Life Saving Australia’s high performance program is rated as on track, having improved from progressing in 2014. The organisation met its benchmark event targets in 2015 after winning the International Surf Rescue Challenge. The performances of its youth squads and younger members of the senior squad were above target in 2015.

Surf Life Saving Australia is delivering programs and workshops to develop better leaders within their athlete cohort and enhance the culture of the group. The organisation needs to solidify its high performance operational leadership through to the 2016 world championships following a year of change in 2015. Surf Life Saving Australia is contributing coastal water flow expertise to water movement research initiatives at Rio’s Copacabana Beach, to help give open water sports a performance edge at the 2016 Olympic Games.

Governance 

Surf Life Saving Australia has continued to work towards adopting the MSGP and performs well in most areas when benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports. The board actively promotes a culture of improvement and regularly undertakes board improvement and assessment activities. The detailed 2020 strategic plan, developed with member bodies, demonstrates a cohesive organisation. Surf Life Saving Australia needs to address director independence in order to achieve a higher benchmark against the MSGP.

2015 benchmark event // international surf rescue challenge

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // lifesaving world championships

Medal target: 1

 

Surfing

Total investment 2015-16: $1,611,600 (high performance: $925,000; participation $586,600; other $100,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 29% 

Surfing Australia’s high performance program is rated as performing. While the overall representation and rankings of Australian surfers on the World Surfing League Series is very healthy the benchmark event targets of 1–2 gold and 3–4 medals overall was down from 2014.

Australia’s top-ranked male surfer, Mick Fanning, finished the year second overall in the world rankings with four top-3 placings in World Surf League (WSL) events in 2016. Sally Fitzgibbon was Australia’s top-ranked female surfer finishing the year ranked third in the world having achieved six top-3 placings in WSL events. Australian men had three surfers finish in the top 10 world rankings and nine in the top 20. Australian women had three in the top 10 world rankings and seven in the top 20.

The 2014 world champion Stephanie Gilmore suffered a season-ending injury in round three of the WSL Series cruelling any chance of defending her title. Surfing Australia leads the world in innovation with the opening of a Skate to Create facility at its high performance centre.

Governance

Surfing Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes in line with the MSGP. The board is comprised of independent directors and has a skills mix appropriate to drive the organisation’s strategic direction. The organisation’s strategic planning processes are extensive and consultative. The Surfing Australia board has committed to undertake annual board evaluations which will complement the culture of ongoing governance improvement.

2015 benchmark event // World Surf League

Medal target: 3-4

Actual: 2

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // World Surf League

Medal target: 3-4

 

Swimming

Total investment 2015-16: $11,271,000 (high performance: $8,415,000; high performance – para $1,910,000; participation $866,000; other $80,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 45% 

Swimming Australia is rated as performing for the Olympic program and on track for the Paralympic program. The performances in the 2015 world championships met benchmark event targets and exceeded its gold medal expectations, with seven gold, three silver and six bronze medals. Australia finished second on the overall medal tally and first if only considering Olympic Games events.

The para program met its medal target in 2015, although the loss of some para swimmers to retirement, injury and reclassification meant that its gold medal expectations were not achieved. Despite this, there appears to be continual improvement in the daily training environment and some encouraging performances from younger swimmers entering the pathway. Similar can be said regarding the open water program with performances below expectations at its benchmark event but progression is being made.

Swimming Australia has built on substantial leadership and cultural changes it initiated after the 2012 Olympic Games, despite losing its high performance director in early 2015. The new leadership team transitioned well and is working effectively in creating a high performance culture that empowers individual team members to accept ownership of their performance and behaviour in and out of the water.

Swimming Australia has been proactive in improving athlete compliance of the AMS and is working with the AIS to refine the system. There is good evidence of quality athletes progressing through the athlete pathway and the Australian team topped the medal tally at the World Junior Championships. They have identified 15 coaches who are participating in the AIS Performance Coaches Program which is considered a high priority for the development of current and future high performance coaches.

Governance

Swimming Australia is progressing with its governance improvements and is making the necessary changes to meet the MSGP. The sport has been working with stakeholders to create a stronger whole-of-sport strategy to address product offerings and governance alignment. The nominations committee has enabled Swimming Australia to appoint highly-skilled directors addressing needs in commercial, digital, legal and governance areas. The sport has made excellent progress towards meeting the 40 per cent women on boards target and recognises the importance of ensuring ongoing equality.

2015 benchmark event // world championships (including open water swim)

Medal target: 13-15

Actual: gold 7 silver 3 bronze 4 total 14

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 26-28

Actual: gold 9 silver 8 bronze 13 total 30

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games (including open water swim)

Medal target: 9-11

 

2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 28-32

  

Table Tennis

(Olympic performance not previously rated in Sports Tally)

Total investment 2015-16: $880,200 (high performance: $253,200; high performance – para $290,000; participation $302,000; other $35,000).

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 46% 

Table Tennis Australia is rated as on track for its Paralympic program and progressing for the Olympic program.

The 2015 performances of the Australian para athletes were encouraging, with four athletes qualifying for the Rio Paralympic Games. These included Melissa Tapper, Australia’s current world championships medallist. Table Tennis Australia is working well across key areas and is focused on growing its opportunities for capturing new athletes, including ongoing work with the Australian Paralympic Committee on athlete profiling and identification.

Olympic Table Tennis commenced as an Australia’s Winning Edge program in July 2015. This was on the back of Australian athletes winning two medals at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. The program is now establishing its Australia’s Winning Edge systems and processes, including a review to determine the best structure for the program under its increased ASC funding.

Governance

Table Tennis Australia has continued working towards adopting the MSGP and performs well when benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports. Members are working to align to a national strategic direction for the sport. Table Tennis Australia needs to continue pushing for constitutional reform to include a chair elected by the board.

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // Oceania Para Regionals

Medal target: 17-20

Actual: gold 7 silver 6 bronze 6 total 19

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Non-medal target: place 9th–16th (x1–2)

2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 0–1

Non-medal target: place 4th–8th (x2)

 

Taekwondo

Total investment 2015-16: $355,000 (high performance: $355,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: Not available (new organization) 

Taekwondo’s high performance program is rated as progressing. Results at the 2015 world championships were below target, however Australia qualified four athletes for 2016 Olympic Games at the 2016 Continental Qualification Tournament in Papua New Guinea.

High-priority athletes have access to adequate daily training environment and competitions, however they require greater exposure to international training environments. Coordination and quality control of athletes when in these environments has been problematic, including providing appropriate access to and delivery of performance support.

A lack of capacity in coaching communication and broader leadership continued to be an issue in 2015. The organisation and the AIS are now in a better position to tackle these issues following Sports Taekwondo Australia’s governance reform and the recent recruitment of a CEO.

Governance

Sports Taekwondo Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make necessary changes in line with the MSGP. The organisation has made progress toward ensuring all parts of the federated structure are working in cohesion and toward a single strategic direction for the sport. Sports Taekwondo Australia must continue to develop a single national entity for all forms of the sport.

2015 benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 0-1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Medal target: N

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 0–1

Non-medal target: place 4th–8th (x1)

Triathlon

Total investment 2015-16: $2,810,000 (high performance: $2,160,000; high performance – para $225,000; participation $425,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 53%  

Triathlon Australia is rated as progressing for the Olympic program, and on track for the Paralympic program. Para-triathlon had a fantastic year exceeding 2015 benchmark event targets by some margin. This was in spite of a restructure of Paralympic classes which included the loss of one class where Australia had a current world champion. The team developed to win three medals in Paralympic events in Chicago, including two gold and one bronze medal.

In able-bodied competition, Triathlon Australia has set lofty goals since the London 2012 Olympic Games, based on a history of podium performances since triathlon was introduced to the Olympics in 2000. Unfortunately this trend has not continued, with Australia unable to achieve a podium finish in a benchmark event since 2013. The men’s section of the sport is improving at the international level from last year, with several young athletes emerging as prospects, arguably for Tokyo 2020 rather than Rio 2016.

Triathlon Australia requested AIS support for a facilitated high performance review after the 2015 benchmark event. Outputs from this review will help guide the organisation’s proposed planning for post-2016, but is unlikely to assist the Rio Olympic campaign. Topics identified include high performance coaching, competition access for athletes below elite level, injury prevention and setting accurate athlete-specific programs at all age levels.

The organisation experienced some management changes in 2015, including a new CEO and a new president who will work closely with the national performance director to deliver new program directions.

With the expansion of Paralympic medal potential athletes, Triathlon Australia will need to closely consider how to support this group with limited resources.

Governance 

Triathlon Australia continues to perform well in aligning with the MSGP. The organisation is working towards a hybrid unified model with some member states looking to merge with the national body.

A unification project working group will complete the final three aspects of this work. Triathlon Australia will look to convene a special general meeting in 2016 where proposed changes in governance will assist future governance improvement.

2015 benchmark event // ITU Series Final Race

Medal target: 1-2

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships

Medal target: 1-2

Actual: gold 2 silver 0 bronze 1 total 3

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 0–1

Non-medal target achieved: place 4th–8th (x1–2)

2016 Paralympic  benchmark event // Paralympic Games

Medal target: 1–2

Volleyball

Total investment 2015-16: $2,810,000 (high performance: $2,460,000; participation $350,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 36% 

Volleyball Australia’s high performance program is rated as on track for the beach program and progressing for the men’s indoor program. Beach volleyball delivered some good benchmark event performances in 2015, meeting targets at the 2015 world championships in Holland and the FIVB World Tour. The main women’s pair won the Asian Championships and is fourth in the Olympic Ranking lists, with 15 qualifying positions available until the mid-2016 cut-off. A second women’s pair and one men’s pair is also likely to qualify through the Continental Cup event in Australia in June.

The men’s indoor team is gradually improving its international standard, but missed its benchmark target when finishing fifth at the Asian Championships. They also finished ninth at the world cup and retained their World League Group 1 place for 2016.

Volleyball Australia is taking aggressive steps to improve its standing before the Rio Olympic Games.

In 2015 Volleyball Australia recruited a new high performance director, new CEO, replaced the men’s indoor head coach and installed a new assistant coach, a former national team captain. Talent pathways into the beach and indoor programs should be enhanced by the expansion of local competition in key states and locations.

Volleyball Australia has increased the quality and number of international contracts for the senior indoor squad players. It is aware of challenges posed by these athletes playing overseas in different clubs immediately before the Rio qualifying competition. While this leaves little time for team preparations the organisation is forming plans to overcome this issue, including the national coach visiting different clubs and players, and high performance staff working on significant communication channels.

The organisation would be looking for more consistency from the national team for the best chance of qualifying for Rio. The team has proven it can compete with many of the teams it must face for qualification.

Governance

Volleyball Australia is progressing with its governance reform and has been working to make the necessary changes in line with the MSGP. The organisation implemented a skills gap analysis in 2015 to assist the nominations committee, and reviewed its risk management framework. It has recently completed a board evaluation and should look to implement the key recommendations highlighted during this process.

2015 benchmark event // beach – FIVB World Tour/world championships

Medal target: 0-1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 1 total 1

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // indoor – Asian Championships (men

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // beach – Olympic Games

Medal target: 0–1

Non-medal target: qualify for semi-final

2016 Paralympic  benchmark event // indoor – Olympic Games (men)

Medal target: 0–1

Non-medal target: place 4th–8th

Water Polo

Total investment 2015-16: $3,595,000 (high performance: $3,385,000; participation $165,000; other $45,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 56% 

Water Polo Australia is rated as on track across both the women’s and men’s programs. Continued focus on athlete development and ongoing exposure to high-level competition has enabled both programs to ensure they have quality athletes in both national squads capable of meeting performance targets for the Rio Olympic Games.

The 2015 world championships were in Kazan, Russia, in August. While the final placing of both teams was disappointing — fourth for the Stingers (women) and eighth for the Sharks (men) — there were some standout performances from both teams during the tournament. These results and post-event reviews have identified adjustments required and have helped focus preparations for Rio.

Water Polo Australia’s appointment of a pathway manager illustrates that identifying and targeting future athletes and coaches is a priority for the organisation.

Governance

Water Polo Australia is progressing with its governance and reform has been working to make the necessary changes in line with MSGP. The organisation has begun a board evaluation and appointed an independent, external CA or CPA onto the audit and risk committee. Following the completion of the board evaluation, Water Polo Australia should implement the key recommendations.

2015 benchmark event // world championships (men)

Medal target: -

Non-medal target achieved: Y

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // world championships (women)

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 0 silver 0 bronze 0 total 0

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games (men)

Medal target: 0–1

Non-medal target: place 4th–8th

2016 Paralympic  benchmark event // Olympic Games (women)

Medal target: 1

 

Weightlifting

Total investment 2015-16: $412,600 (high performance: $362,600; participation $50,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 41% 

The Australian Weightlifting Federation’s high performance program is rated as progressing.

Australia won two silver medals at the 2015 men’s benchmark event, the Commonwealth Championships, and other newcomers to the squad also performed well. A key athlete was unavailable to compete in the event due to health reasons, which hindered efforts to meet the overall performance target of three medals.

The women’s team was unable to achieve their targets at the 2015 IWF World Championships, however results were overall significantly better than those of the 2014 world championships team. This is

a positive step and demonstrates an increasing standard of Australian women’s weightlifting. The federation’s program has seen many positive shifts over the past year, including the recruitment of a high performance coordinator. This will help maintain high standards and provide support to the CEO in developing a long-term, sustainable high performance program. The federation has also rationalised its list of categorised athletes to better allocate resources and all categorised athletes now have monitored individual performance plans in place. Over the next year the federation will formalise its high performance coaching structures, finalise governance and decision-making arrangements for the high performance panel and implement athlete and coaching monitoring systems within a decentralised environment.

Governance

The Australian Weightlifting Federation has continued to work towards adopting the MSGP and performs well when benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports. It has increased female representation on its board, meeting the required 40 per cent target. The federation must continue to work on building its governance systems and policies to address crucial integrity and sports science and sports medicine principles.

2015 benchmark event // // Commonwealth Championships (men)/world championships (women)

Medal target: 3

Actual: gold 0 silver 2 bronze 0 total 2

Non-medal target: N

Performance target

2016 benchmark event // Olympic Games

Non-medal target: place 9th–14th (x2)

Wheelchair tennis

Total investment (Tennis Australia) 2015-16: $1,237,250 (high performance – para $261,250; participation $966,000; other $10,000)

ASC funding as a percentage of total income: 1% 

Wheelchair Tennis is rated as on track. The national high performance program made good progress in 2015, meeting performance expectations. Highlights included Dylan Alcott’s Grand Slam singles wins at the Australian and US Opens and his world No. 1 ranking.

The structure of the high performance program has matured and is now well integrated into Tennis Australia’s national strategy, with a good athlete pathway, good athlete monitoring and well-developed support systems.

The program also makes effective use of research and innovation opportunities such as the Australian Paralympic Committee’s seating project, for which Wheelchair Tennis was the pilot sport. The project produced two new playing chairs for priority athletes in 2015.

Governance

A broad range of programs such as Wheelchair Tennis are delivered under the governance structures of Tennis Australia. Tennis Australia has undertaken significant governance reform in 2015 to align with the MSGP and excels when benchmarked against Australia’s Winning Edge sports. Tennis Australia will undertake an external and independent board evaluation in 2016 which will positively impact future governance improvement.

2015 Paralympic benchmark event // world rankings

Medal target: 1

Actual: gold 1 silver 0 bronze 0 total 1

Performance target

2016 Paralympic benchmark event // Olympic Games

Medal target: 0–2

Non-medal target: place 4th–8th (x1–2)

Follow us

follow us on facebook follow us on youtube follow us on twitter follow us on instagram
AIS Shop - Dress like a champion