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Current Research - Injury Study

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AIS Injury Study - The genetics of exercise-induced injuries involving tendon and bone

Are you:

  • a recreational runner, running more than 15km a week, and
  • aged 18 or over?

Take the online survey.

Runners who complete the survey receive a 25 per cent discount offer on TomTom GPS fitness watches (offer ends 31 December 2016).

The AIS is looking for runners to participate in a research project on the role of genetics in exercise-induced injuries.

This study aims to identify genetic variations that contribute to increased risk of, or protection from tendon and bone injuries sustained through participation in physical activity.

We invite you to participate in our online survey to help provide new insights into the genetic factors associated with exercise-induced injuries in recreational and elite athletes. This knowledge will be used to develop programs for the prevention of injury in sport and physical activity.

For more information please see below or email us.


Aim of the study

The aim of this research study is to identify genetic polymorphisms that contribute to increased risk of, or protection from tendon and bone injuries sustained through participation in physical activity. This knowledge will be used to develop programs for the prevention of injury in sport and physical activity.

Study summary

Participation in physical activity has been shown to be extremely beneficial to health however; participation in both recreational and competitive sports increases the risk of acquiring injuries of both the soft tissues and bones. Sporting success at the international level is significantly impacted by loss of training and competition time through injury. Research that examines new approaches to reducing the number of days lost to training through injury or illness and research that examines mechanisms that have the potential to change injury or illness management are a priority for the Australian elite sport sector. Identification of factors predisposing athletes to injury will allow coaches to customise training loads for individuals, according to injury susceptibility. Clinicians will be able to administer preventative, evidence-based interventions to reduce the rate of athlete injury.

This research study will focus on the role of genetics in exercise-induced injuries. Understanding genetic risk of or protection from exercise-induced injuries of the tendon and bone will allow coaches, trainers, physicians and physical therapists to develop training programs that account for such conditions. This study aims to identify genetic polymorphisms (genetic variation resulting in different biochemical characteristics) that contribute to increased risk of, or protection from tendon and bone injuries sustained through participation in physical activity. The proposed study will provide world-first evidence regarding the association between genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to exercise-induced bony stress injuries.

With advancements in molecular biology, the use of personalised medicine to prevent and treat exercise-related medical conditions will become a reality. Understanding genetic risk of or protection from exercise-induced injuries of the tendon and bone will allow coaches, trainers, physicians and physical therapists to develop training programs that account for such conditions. In addition, identification of genetic polymorphisms in relation to bone and tendon health may give rise to further research into potential causes, therapies, personalised training strategies and diagnostic tools in the field of bone and tendon injuries. 

The research team

This project is an initiative of the Collaborative Research Network (CRN) for Advancing Exercise and Sports Science, bringing together partners from key research and sport science institutions including Bond University, the University of Sydney, University of Queensland Diamantina Institute and the Australian Institute of Sport for the project valued at over $14 million.

The overall goal of this study is to better understand the relationship between lifestyle, health status and genetic profile and we hope that this information will ultimately improve health and quality of life, prevent injury or disability, and prevent or treat chronic diseases. 

For more information on the CRN and related projects please visit the Bond University website.

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