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Community Coaching General Principles

The Community Coaching General Principles program sets a minimum standard for all sports involved in the National Coaching Accreditation Scheme (NCAS). The documents below will assist sports in the development of sport specific NCAS training programs and the delivery of the Community Coaching General Principles.

The ASC provides an online version of the Community Coaching General Principles course.

CCGP Curriculum Overview


Competency statements

At the completion of this training program (four modules), the coach will be able to:

  1. Explain the role, legal obligations and ethical responsibilities of a community coach.
  2. Identify sport or activity specific risks and principles of risk management related to coaching.
  3. Prepare a coaching session plan.
  4. Select coaching methods and activities appropriate to participant needs and characteristics.
  5. Safely conduct a coaching session, ensuring fun, learning and maximum participation through games and activities.
  6. Utilise a range of communication skills and behaviour management strategies to help participants learn basic skills and tactics.
  7. Develop strategies to build effective working relationships with parents, officials and sports administrators.
  8. Review coaching sessions and own performance to identify improvements.

Relationship to SIS10 V3.1

While there is some overlapping aspects of each unit of competence in each module, predominantly:

  • Module 1 would cover the unit SISSSCO101 Develop and update knowledge of coaching practices.
  • Modules 2 & 4 would cover SISSSCO202 Coach beginner or novice participants to develop fundamental motor skills.
  • Module 3 would cover SISSSDE201 Communicate effectively with others in a sport environment.

Collectively if someone completed all four modules plus the required assessment tasks they could meet the requirements for the proposed Community Coach Skill Set.

Community Coaching General Principles Curriculum Overview
Module Learning Outcomes Content Delivery Assessment
1. Snapshot of a good coach At the end of this module:
‘I know what I need to do to meet the needs of those I coach’.
The primary aim of the module is to provide a snapshot of a good coach including roles and responsibilities and the coaching pathway.                   
• What does a coach do?
• What does a coach need to know?
• How should a coach behave?
• Where can coaches go for more information?                   
Online         Worksheets         Play by The Rules
Group discussion
Presentation
Videos
                   
            Online            Worksheets        Practical coaching task
Questioning
Group discussion
                   
2. Preparing to Coach                               

At the end of this module:
‘I will be able to prepare a session plan’.
The primary aim of the module is to develop planning skills to put together a session plan to meet participants’ needs and achieve desired goals.

                   
• Why does a coach need to plan?
• What are the participants’ needs?
• What do I want to achieve?
• What should a coach’s plan include?
• What are the different coaching approaches I can use?
• How can I keep everyone safe?                
Online            Worksheets Group discussion         Presentation
Video            Practical                   
Online
Session Plan   Worksheets
Practical coaching task                   
3. Working with others                    At the end of this module:
‘I will be able to communicate effectively to build positive relationships with participants and others involved in physical activity and sport’.
The primary aim of the module is to provide a range of communication and basic conflict resolution techniques relevant to the coaching environment.                   
• What communication skills do coaches need?
• How do I choose the right style?
• How do I deal with issues and problems that might arise?                   
           

Online            Worksheets
Role Play
Case studies / Scenarios
Group discussion         Practical

                   
Online
Practical
Worksheets
Role Play                   
4. Coach in Action                    At the end of this module:
‘I will be able to safely conduct a coaching session, ensuring fun, learning and maximum participation through games and activities’.
The primary aim of this module is to provide knowledge of a range of organisation, communication, risk and behaviour management strategies that enable coaches to help participants learn basic skills and techniques.                   

• What do I need to organise?
• How do I choose the right coaching approach?
• How do I minimise risks?
• How can I enhance learning?
• How do I make it fun?
• How do I deal with misbehaviour?
• How can I be a better coach?                   

Online            Practical            Role Play
Case studies / Scenarios
Group discussion                   
Online
Practical coaching task
Case Study / Scenario
Role Play                   


Module 1 Curriculum


Learning outcome

At the end of this module: ‘I know what I need to do to meet the needs of those I coach’.

The primary aim of the module is to provide a snapshot of a good coach including roles and responsibilities and the coaching pathway.

Module 1 Content

What does a coach do?

  • Roles of the coach for competition and participation and skills required
  • Range of coaching styles for different situations and individuals (direct to indirect)
  • Limitations to the role that the coach is able to play in injury management if they are not trained in first aid or providing nutrition advice
  • Understanding the coaches role in relation to others: AASC regional coordinators, school staff, club administrators and other coaches
  • Opportunities for coaches to have a positive impact on participants

What does a coach need to know?

  • Sport structure in Australia – understanding the bigger picture and implications for coaching:
    • local and regional bodies
    • club, state and national sport organisations
    • sport policies (eg/ member protection, junior sport frameworks)
  • Legal responsibilities of a coach:
    • anti discrimination
    • public liability and duty of care
    • negligence
    • insurance
    • child protection
    • mandatory reporting
    • privacy and confidentiality
  • Risk management principles:
    • relevant activity specific safety requirements (including personal protective equipment)
    • injury prevention
    • risk identification and hazard control
    • risk minimisation
    • medical conditions and clearances
    • safety requirements for spectators and support personnel
    • adequate supervision and ratios
    • keeping accurate records, including emergency contact details, medical conditions and injury or accident reports
    • emergency incident procedures
  • Coach safety and protection:
    • not being alone with participants
    • appropriate physical contact
    • insurance

How should a coach behave?


  • Personal qualities, presentation and passion
  • Ethical responsibilities:
    • your organisation’s code of behaviour for coaches and the relevant components of the member protection policy
    • the requirements of your organisation’s specific policies (eg/ junior sport, inclusion)
    • being inclusive and balanced in your approach
    • treating participants with integrity, respect and empathy
    • drugs in sport issues including:
      • ASC Anti-Doping policy
      • the coach as a role model regarding social drug use
      • ethical and health issues regarding the use of drugs in sport
  • Personal values vs. community values

Where can coaches go for more information?

  • Sourcing information on coaching in your spo
  • Coaching pathways - NCAS, NSO role, AASC
  • AASC Program and objectives and transition from AASC to club sport
  • Who to contact to maintain your coaching accreditation or AASC registration
  • Professional development opportunities and resources to develop coaching skills


Module 2 Curriculum


Learning outcome

At the end of this module, ‘I will be able to prepare a session plan’.

The primary aim of the module is to develop planning skills to put together a session plan to meet participants’ needs and achieve desired goals.

Module 2 Content

Why does a coach need to plan?

  • Duty of care implications of not planning
  • Making the most of your time
  • Getting the best from your participants

What are my participants’ needs?

  • Stages of growth and development (childhood, adolescence, and the aging process) and readiness for skill acquisition
  • The importance of emphasising skills before fitness in beginners
  • Extremes that may occur in body composition, fitness and skill levels between individuals
  • Reasons why children play sport and the role of competition
  • Social considerations for participation in sport
  • Accommodating the varying motivations for participating in sport
  • Gender differences

What do I want to achieve?

  • Setting goals and objectives:
    • session vs. program, term or season goals
    • Individual vs. team
    • competition vs. practice
    • tactical, technical or social
  • SMART goal setting
  • Progress markers

What should my plan include?

  • Key elements of a session plan
  • Sourcing and selecting a variety of activities appropriate for training sessions
  • Determining a suitable progression of activities, taking into account individual needs
  • Preparing instructions and questions
  • Ensuring that the session plan is inclusive of all participants
  • Developing contingency plans that accommodate potential unplanned influences
  • Identifying facilities, equipment and resources required
  • Linking sessions to develop or progress skills
  • Time management
What are the different coaching approaches I can use?

Different coaching approaches or philosophies:

  • Game centred approach
    • using games to assist participants to understand game concepts
    • creating games to teach skills within the context of specific tactics and strategies
    • using a “Playing for Life” philosophy where inclusive games or activities teach participants and the coach facilitates learning
  • ;
  • Technique centred approach
    • isolating the skill from the whole game to prioritise it’s development over game play
    • using skills to facilitate development of movement patterns, then applied to the game
  • Constraints coaching approach
    • integrates game and technique coaching approaches at an appropriate level for the stage of learning of the participant
    • skill development and game performance is the outcome of manipulating:
      • task (eg/ rules of the game, equipment)
      • environment (eg/ skill performance context, indoors/outdoors, grass/concrete surface)
      • participant constraints (eg/ physical size of participant, fatigue)
    • blending direct and indirect instructional coaching styles to achieve a specific movement outcome or game performance.

How can I keep everyone safe?

  • Identifying potential risks within the coaching environment and sport or activity specific risks
  • Selecting strategies or procedures to minimise risks:
    • selecting age and ability appropriate activities and equipment
    • managing illness, medical conditions and return from injury
    • selecting the playing area
    • considering likely environmental conditions
    • warm up, stretch and cool down
    • balanced competition – size or weight and height match ups
    • pick up arrangements for children
  • Understanding safety, injury management and emergency procedures
  • Planning alternatives to deal with contingencies such as inclement weather
  • Incident reporting procedures


Module 3 Curriculum


Learning outcomes

At the end of this module, ‘I will be able to communicate effectively to build positive relationships with participants and others involved in physical activity and sport’.

The primary aim of the module is to provide a range of communication and basic conflict resolution techniques relevant to the coaching environment.

Module 3 Content

What communication skills do coaches need?

  • Selecting from a range of communication techniques:
    • non-verbal
    • active listening
    • demonstrations
    • inclusive communication
    • providing feedback

  • Barriers to effective communication
  • Understanding individual differences:

    • communicating with a diverse range of participants (cultural, age and social differences)
    • learning styles
    • motivation
  • Use of social media

How do I choose the right style?


  • Selecting coaching styles from direct to indirect for different situations and individuals:

    • friendly and approachable while maintaining a 'professional distance'
    • directive regarding non-negotiable issues such as safety factors
    • casual
    • critical friend
    • motivational
    • disciplinarian
    • humorous when appropriate
    • organised and efficient
    • supportive and encouraging
  • The coach as role model:
    • promoting cooperation and good relationships
    • acceptable language
    • arriving on time
    • presentation standards
    • self-reflection to identify areas for improvement

How do I deal with issues and problems that might arise?

  • Preventing issues by building relationships with others:
    • identifying key stakeholders
    • strategies for gaining support from key people
    • understanding climate or environment in which you coach (difficult or supportive)
    • being clear about your role and responsibilities in relation to others
    • respecting different personal values and beliefs
  • Working positively with parents (including expectations of parents)
  • Working with officials (including the issue of abuse and how coaches can have a positive influence)
  • Working positively with Boards and Committees
  • Roles and relationships with sports administrators or school staff
  • Choices when dealing with difficult behaviour:
    • listen more, talk less
    • understand the intent
    • work out how to resolve the conflict or prevent it reoccurring
    • know when to walk away, seek assistance from others or refer the matter to someone else


Module 4 Curriculum


Learning outcome

At the end of this module, ‘I will be able to safely conduct a coaching session, ensuring fun, learning and maximum participation through games and activities’.

The primary aim of this module is to provide knowledge of a range of organisation, communication, risk and behaviour management strategies that enable coaches to help participants learn basic skills and techniques.

Module 4 Content

What do I need to organise?


  • Allocating sufficient space and resources for the session
  • Set up and layout plans for effective use of space
  • Selecting and checking equipment
  • Training formations and group organisation strategies:
    • structuring activities to maximise participation
    • including a range of ability levels
    • transition activities

How do I choose the right coaching approach?

Match the coaching approach to participants needs:

  • developing games to assist participants to understand game concepts
  • using a game-based approach to teach skills
  • recognising when to isolate a skill from the context of a game
  • understanding the tools available to modify an activity to meet the needs of participants
  • using direct and indirect coaching styles to achieve a specific movement outcome or game performance

How do I minimise risks?

  • Applying risk management strategies:
    • selecting age and ability appropriate activities and equipment
    • managing illness, medical conditions and return from injury
    • checking the playing area, facilities and equipment
    • considering environmental conditions (including weather policies)
    • including warm up, stretch and cool down
  • Communicating key safety points:
    • obeying the rules
    • use of protective equipment
    • hydration
  • Balanced competition – size or weight and height match ups
  • First Aid and dealing with incidents (STOP and RICER)

How can I enhance learning?

  • Creating a learning climate
    • Instructions, demonstrations and explanations
    • Feedback
    • Modifying activities (progression and regression)
    • Integrating learning in tactical, technical and social areas
  • Development of competence, confidence, connection and character

How do I make it fun?


  • Group organisation
  • Engaging the participants
  • Encouraging self-management
  • Strategies for preventing misbehaviour
  • Providing clear instructions
  • Linking instructions to demonstrations
  • Allowing participants to play
  • Providing opportunities for experimentation
  • Selecting age and ability appropriate equipment
  • Setting clear boundaries
  • Ensuring young participants are not mismatched
  • Providing appropriate challenge

How do I deal with misbehaviour?

  • Establishing behaviour standards and appropriate behaviour for individuals and groups
  • Promoting cooperation and good relationships
  • Common causes of disruptive behaviour
  • Preventing behaviour problems:
    • developing a positive environment
    • creating rules and sharing your expectations
    • praise good behaviours when they least expect it
    • value individual differences
  • Behaviour management strategies:

    • misbehaviour
    • over competitiveness
    • domineering behaviour
    • non-participation

How can I be a better coach?


  • Gathering feedback and self-reflection
  • Checking actual against plan – what worked and what didn’t
  • Working out what should I do different next time
  • Designing links to future sessions to develop or progress skills
  • Identifying personal professional development needs


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