Australia tops medal tally at Global Games

Lindsay Sutton pictured with coach Panais Negropontis
Lindsay Sutton pictured with coach Panais Negropontis
Australian swimmer Kara Leo
Kara Leo

05 Oct 2011


Australia finished top of the medal tally at the recent third INAS Global Games with a string of outstanding performances from our athletes.

The Global Games is an Olympic-style multi-sport event for top athletes with intellectual disability. Held every four years, athletes compete in athletics, futsal, tennis, swimming cycling, table tennis and basketball.

Around 700 athletes from over 30 different countries competed at the 10-day event held in the Italian Riviera in September–October this year.

Australia, which finished top of the medal tally at the previous 2009 Games, repeated the performance to win a total of 52 medals, including 28 gold, 13 silver and 11 bronze.

The swimming team again stole the show, picking up an incredible 21 gold medals, with rising teenage stars Amanda Fowler and Mitchell Kilduff sharing 13 individual medals between them.

The Australian Pearls women’s basketball team won gold on the final day of competition with a 65–42 win over the Japanese women’s team, capping off an excellent tournament.

The Australian tennis contingent all claimed medals across the week, with the team eventually winning eight medals, including four gold, two silver and two bronze.

Lindsay Sutton won two gold medals in the athletics field program, along the way smashing his own world record in the hammer throw. Sutton threw the hammer 47.44 metres, beating his old mark by over 2 metres. He followed this success by claiming gold in the discus.

The Australian Government contributed $75 000 towards the Global Games, continuing its support for athletes with an intellectual disability.

AUSRAPID Chief Executive Officer, Robyn Smith, was Head of Delegation for the Australian team was delighted with the team’s success across all sports.

She said the Australia’s success at the Global Games can be attributed to sports adopting an inclusive approach for people with a disability.

‘Thank you to all those who have played a part in supporting, selecting and preparing the Australian team for competition in Liguria, Italy,’ she said.

‘The success of the team further highlights how successful our inclusive approach to sport for people with a disability is in Australia.

‘A special thanks to the Australian Government through the Australian Sports Commission, Athletics Australia, Basketball Australia, Cycling Australia, Swimming Australia, Table Tennis Australia, Tennis Australia and Football Federation Australia and the Australian Paralympic Committee for their ongoing mainstream pathway support for athletes with an intellectual disability.

‘The athletes and their staff were exceptional in representing Australia, not only in their respective fields of endeavour, but also off the sporting arena, leaving the Italian hosts impressed with our friendliness and sportsmanship.’

AUSRAPID is a national organisation established in 1986 to increase sporting and recreational opportunities for all people with an intellectual disability in Australia.

 Athletes with an intellectual disability will compete at next year’s London Paralympic Games for the first time since they last competed at the Sydney 2000 Paralympics.  

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Did you know?

Australia has competed in every Summer Paralympics since the first games in 1960.

Quick numbers

141 thousand people have so far completed the ASC online coaching course.
10 current or former AIS athletes won medals at the London 2012 Paralympic Games.
56 current or former AIS athletes won medals at the London 2012 Olympic Games.
35 thousand kilometres were swum by Petria Thomas while at the AIS.
26 thousand people have so far completed the ASC online officiating course.
0.5 million people visit the AIS each year.